Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E - Page 5

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Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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Only if you signed an agreemnt to that effect during purchase.

--
Andrew



Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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I signed no agreements with Autodesk. Because they copyrighted their
software, they exercize control over it whether I agree or not. Bith
copyrights and patents give the owner rights over their IP.

John



Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


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I think you will find that somewhere in the small print it says that you
agree to all their draconian terms and conditions by opening the shrink
wrap packaging and clicking on OK or "I accept" during the installation
where a long screed you are supposed to read is typically displayed.

I am amazed that they were quite so heavy handed though!
I take it that they had a warrant to enter and search your premises.

Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 09:02:55 +0100, Martin Brown

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No. A disgruntled ex-employee (that's another story) called several
software companies and told them we were cheating on licenses. PADS
called us and asked about it, we explained (two paid licenses, one
layout person) and they said OK. They must be used to disgruntled
layout people. Autocad hired a law firm, or at least sicced one of
their hired guns on us. Their doofus lawyer sent many nasty letters
accusing us of things and demanding stuff. I wasted a *lot* of their
time, just for fun and to make sure it cost Autodesk a bunch, and
eventually sent them the stuff they demanded, basically xeroxes of the
UPC tags on all of the Autodesk stuff we had. That was, like, 7
things, including one student copy of Autocad, which I offered to sell
back to them. They didn't want it.

John


Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



"Dyna Soar"
" Farkin Larkin "

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 ** His video presentation breaks NO law in either place.


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 **  Precisely.

But FJ is alluding to the possible effect on Rigol's sales of their phoney
100MHz version.


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 ** His video presentation breaks NO law in either place.

 FJ's claim to the contrary is entirely  RIDICULOUS !!


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** What is REALLY demonstrates is that FJ has done something with one of his
designs that is close enough to the Rigol case  for  ** HIM **   to feel
very confronted by Dave's video presentation.

IOW  -  a clear case of guilty conscience induced paranoia.

IOW  -  the colossal fool protesteth far too bloody much.



....   Phil






Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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This is a discussion group, and I furnish material to discuss. You'd
be happier posting to one of the cursing groups.

John


Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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If I choose to improve something by modifying it after purchasing it
then I will do so. This could be anything from changing caps in a PSU to
 replacing op amps in an audio circuit or overclocking a CPU.
If the modification is simply a configuration change in software then
that makes it easier.

Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


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He exercised his right of free speech. Nothing more, nothing less.

--
Andrew



Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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They could as has been pointed out do sampling, some may fall below the
100MHz threshold and are destined to become 50MHz versions. There is no real
guarantee that a 50MHz scope when hacked will perform as well as a bought
100MHz scope. But that's the risk the end user takes in carrying out the
mod.

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Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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Excuse me, don't both models have a 20 MHz limited bandwidth mode using20%
that same circuit?  In that case what extra parts?  Just a few lines of20%
code more.

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Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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Is it worth that much?


Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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I see and understand "Nial Stewarts" point.

  $0.50 is like a slap in the face for MS..

   I would how ever, do the honorable deed and pay $0.75 for it.


Jamie.



Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


On Wed, 31 Mar 2010 19:21:55 -0500, Jamie =

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Your choice, i will hesitate on giving them 2 bits ($0.25).

Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E



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Interesting you mention Microsoft.

If I recall correctly, I think the only difference between the
Workstation and Server forms of NT was a pair of registry entries.

These could only be set correctly upon install, once running in
whichever guise, the operating sytem made it impossible to change either
one as the opposing pair enabled some algortihm to prevent change.

Perhaps this was an urban legend, but it would not surprise me.

From http://oreilly.com/news/differences_nt.html

Microsoft recently introduced version 4.0 of NT Workstation (NTW) and NT
Server (NTS), and claims that there are substantial technical
differences between the Workstation and Server products. Microsoft uses
this claim to justify an $800 price difference between NTW and NTS, as
well as legal limits on web server usage in NTW, both of which have
enormous impact on existing NTW users. But what if the supposed
technical differences at the heart of NTW and NTS are mythical?

We have found that NTS and NTW have identical kernels; in fact, NT is a
single operating system with two modes. Only two registry settings are
needed to switch between these two modes in NT 4.0, and only one setting
in NT 3.51. This is extremely significant, and calls into question the
related legal limitations and costly upgrades that currently face NTW
users.


Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


On Wed, 31 Mar 2010 03:02:13 -0500, "George Jefferson"

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People buy the standard and Pro versions of Windows knowing the only
difference is a few flags. Windows consumer versions are brain-damaged
to allow only a small number of network connections at a time, and
cost almost nothing bundled with a PC. Windows Server removes the
limit and costs about $2K.

I'm sure that all sorts of expensive automotive options are just
firmware these days. All sorts of products differ only in theor
firmware.

It's Rigol's choice how to price their products and amortize their
engineering. Buying their 50 MHz scope and hacking it, and gleefully
telling the world how to do it, it is essentially vandalism. Legally,
it may be criminal conspiracy to use a computer to commit a crime.

Jones is perfectly capable of estimating the considerable economic
damage he is doing to Rigol. I suppose he hates Rigol enough that he's
happy about it.

If you spent years writing a book or some software, would you be happy
if people copied it and distributed it for free, cutting off your
rotalties? After all, copies cost almost nothing. Now can you justify
charging $20 for a book or $500 for a program when it costs pennies to
manufacture copies?

John


Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


On a sunny day (Wed, 31 Mar 2010 07:01:39 -0700) it happened John Larkin

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Yes MS is a bunch or criminals who ask hundreds of dollars for crappy software.
They and Hollywood buy the system to impose laws so people who work around it
are branded as criminals.
In MS case Linux is the way out.


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Well, a Ferrari looks different.


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Yes.



No it is not, it is exposing the market mechanism.
You bought the hardware, it has everything IN it, INCLUDING
a varicap SO EXTRA COMPONENTS to make it inferior.
Disabling something that purposely reduces performance of something YOU OWN is
GOOD.

Dave is taking a risk (these days with millennium copyright act and such),
but is helping all those OWNERS of that hardware to a better scope.

What this society no longer seems to recognise is OWNERSHIP,
that goes from your property being taxed to your say over your life.

He owns that scope, and the serial interface came with it.



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Fixing your car may be a crime too in the future.
maybe designing electronics is a crime too?
F*ck off.

Kudos for Dave, and f*ck that Millennium act and its puppets,
May else the nukes rain.

Have a nice rainy day.



Re: Turn your Rigol DS1052E Oscilloscope into a 100MHz DS1102E


On Apr 1, 12:01A0%am, John Larkin

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Well, not really. You don't buy the software, you only license it. You
have to agree to the EULA for it to install. If you figure out how to
use regedit to enable certain features, it isn't illegal to tell
people how to do so (of course they may be violating the EULA if they
do)

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Hang on a second. It's only Rigol's scope until I buy it. When I buy
it, it's mine. Not theirs. You don't have to sign an agreement that
says you won't modify it.

What crime is possibly being committed? To the best of my knowledge,
there is no charge of "taking advantage of a companies stupid business
decision".


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Apples and Oranges.

The customer only ever owns the physical copy of the book, or the CD
the software came from. The customer does not own the IP itself. The
customer CAN modify their property (Eg scribble over pages or smash
the CD in half). When you buy a Rigol scope, Rigol may still own the
IP to the design, but you own and can modify the scope itself.

It's illegal to make copies of the book or software without permission
because otherwise there is no real way for programmers or authors to
make an income.

Rigol were foolish by making their scope so easy to upgrade. Some
software mods could have made the job much harder. You can hardly say
that without a law to prevent modification to "their" product (which
is now owned by the customer) it's impossible for scope manufacturers
to make a living. If they HAVE to make a product and cripple it to
make a low-end model, they are free to use every trick in the book to
prevent it being modified. Rigol didn't bother.

I own a car - I do not own the IP associated with that car (an untold
number of patents, copyright on the microcontroller firmware etc). I
service it myself - you seem to be saying that's unethical. After all,
I'm taking business away from my local mechanic. Suppose I find a very
easy way to boost the engine output by cutting a certain wire, which
fools the ECU into thinking I paid for a better motor. Is it unethical
for me to tell people? I don't think so.

Al