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Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 20:26:44 +1100, Sylvia Else

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  cANNOT 'SOLDER' STAINLESS.  iT requires A WELD JOINT, WHICH IS DEFINED
BY both

  Cannot 'solder' stainless.  It REQUIRES a weld joint, which is defined
by BOTH surface having been melted, and joined.

  "Solder" melts NEITHER surface, and is 100% adhesive or cohesive
attachment, but that only upon the surface molecules of the workpieces.

  Welding makes fully melded bonds.

  Spot welding is what you want, but deformation at the joint must be
avoided.

Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:
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CAN SOLDER STAINLESS STEEL.
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CAN


Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
us:

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  You use incorrect terminology.
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  Can attach, but the action is not "soldering".

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Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:
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Soft Soldering

All grades of stainless steel can be soldered with lead-tin soft solder.  
Leaded solders should not be used when the product being soldered is  
used for food processing, serving or transport. Soldered joints are  
relatively weak compared to the strength of the steel, so this method  
should not be used where the mechanical strength is dependent upon the  
soldered joint. Strength can be added if the edges are first  
lock-seamed, spot welded or riveted. In general welding is always  
preferable to soldering.
Recommended Procedure for Soldering

Recommended procedure for soldering:

?         1. The steel surfaces must be clean and free of oxidation.

?         2. A rough surface improves adherence of the solder, so  
roughening with grinding wheel, file or coarse abrasive paper is  
recommended.

?         3. Use a phosphoric acid based flux. Hydrochloric acid based  
fluxes require neutralising after soldering as any remnant traces will  
be highly corrosive to the steel. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes are not  
recommended for soldering of stainless steels.

?         4. Flux should be applied with a brush, to only the area being  
soldered.

?         5. A large, hot iron is recommended. Use the same temperature  
as for carbon steel, but a longer time will be required because of  
stainless steel's low thermal conductivity.

?         6. Any type of solder can be used, but at least 50% tin is  
recommended. Solder with 60-70% tin and 30-40% lead has a better colour  
match and greater strength.


Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 17:51:21 -0800, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:

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Solder alloys with the surface, to a depth dependent on temperature, and
duration. Soldering copper creates a layer of a type of bronze.

--  
"Design is the reverse of analysis"
                   (R.D. Middlebrook)

Re: Soldering stainless steel wire

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It's easy to soft-solder stainless steel, if one uses the correct flux.

Tinners flux (zinc chloride and hydrochloric acid in water)  is
available in many hardware stores, and will usually do it.  

There are also liquid fluxes (containing phosphoric acid) intended for
stainless steel.  If you are doing much soldering, I'd get the correct
flux.

In both cases, the surfaces should be cleaned mechanically until bright.

Joe Gwinn

Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
Sylvia Else wrote:
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   One cannot solder stainless steel; weld copper, silver or brass to it  
(or electroplate as you mentioned).
   BTW, if you are working with stainless steel, make sure all pieces  
are from the same batch and you use some of that for welding the rest.


Re: Soldering stainless steel wire
Robert Baer wrote:
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Why do people keep saying that you can not solder stainless steel?

when I have been doing it for ages and directions such as this exist.

Soft Soldering

All grades of stainless steel can be soldered with lead-tin soft solder.  
Leaded solders should not be used when the product being soldered is  
used for food processing, serving or transport. Soldered joints are  
relatively weak compared to the strength of the steel, so this method  
should not be used where the mechanical strength is dependent upon the  
soldered joint. Strength can be added if the edges are first  
lock-seamed, spot welded or riveted. In general welding is always  
preferable to soldering.
Recommended Procedure for Soldering

Recommended procedure for soldering:

?         1. The steel surfaces must be clean and free of oxidation.

?         2. A rough surface improves adherence of the solder, so  
roughening with grinding wheel, file or coarse abrasive paper is  
recommended.

?         3. Use a phosphoric acid based flux. Hydrochloric acid based  
fluxes require neutralising after soldering as any remnant traces will  
be highly corrosive to the steel. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes are not  
recommended for soldering of stainless steels.

?         4. Flux should be applied with a brush, to only the area being  
soldered.

?         5. A large, hot iron is recommended. Use the same temperature  
as for carbon steel, but a longer time will be required because of  
stainless steel's low thermal conductivity.

?         6. Any type of solder can be used, but at least 50% tin is  
recommended. Solder with 60-70% tin and 30-40% lead has a better colour  
match and greater strength.


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