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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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I download first with clive:  http://home.gna.org/clive /
Then VLC or mplayer...


Ian

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
On Fri, 16 May 2008 08:55:12 -0700, in comp.arch.embedded Joerg

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this:http://www.alibaba.com/sellinglead-gs/206540398/Sell_Super_Deal_UMPC_ ...
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I use riva  flv player, or VLC. Both seem free of problems. VLC has a
nice feature of allowing you to see the decoding functions as messages
when you can't figure out what the hell is wrong with a video

1337 player is very good for avi files, very user friendly, but hogs
the system if it tries to decode a faulty file


martin

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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this:http://www.alibaba.com/sellinglead-gs/206540398/Sell_Super_Deal_UMPC_ ...
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Hmm, in my case it did not work. Neither with nor without the matching
Firefox plug-in. I try to avoid Adobe products because some like the
Acrobat reader are crashing way too often and too violently.


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That would not be so good.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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My EeePC?

I think it's using an mplayer plugin for firefox to do the job, but
I'm not really sure because it just worked out of the box ;-)



Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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Most consumer grade PCs do that as well but this is a biz version and
didn't come with the usual "gizmo" software ;-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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What's noteworthy in this case is that the "just works" is achieved
out of the box with the kinds of open-source alternatives being
proposed here - mplayer plugin to firefox. all running under linux.

As for safety, booting a live linux CD with comparable out-of-the-box
capability in a virtual machine and doing your browsing in that should
do pretty well.

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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And can your PDA run standard linux or windows executables without
recompiling?

Does you PDA have a full keyboard?

A C compiler that runs on it?

The EeePC  is not the world's best laptop, but it's 90% of what a
laptop computer is supposed to be, in a the form factor of a large PDA.

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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That's exactly the problem. And the reason why i do not have one.


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AFAIK you can buy one.


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So, can EeePC run stuff like DesignCAD-3D or other such Windows apps?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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You do know that you can get Windows ones, right?

--

John Devereux

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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Yes, but cs_posting wrote that it isn't really suited to run those apps.
Well, in that case it ain't too useful for me. The other two reasons are
that the battery lifetime is not significantly better than on a Dell
laptop and that CostCo charges $549 for the Eee while I can get a basic
Dell for around $400. Which does run DesignCAD and all that.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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I don't know anything about DesignCad 3D, but I got the impression
that you use a lot of "legacy" software? It should run all the older
stuff I would think. Apart from dongle issues perhaps.

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Sure, the whole point is the compact size and light weight. If this is
not important to you, no point in paying for it.

I just bought a couple of laptops for a customer. The original spec
was they had to be lightweight. Then they decided the screens were too
small - we saved $300 each by going to *larger* screen models.

--

John Devereux

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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No dongles here. I never bought SW with those and never will. Yeah, I do
run legacy stuff, have to. Except now there are no laptops anymore that
perform as well as my old Contura did (using some of the same SW). The
EeePC is no exception, it doesn't even come close in battery runtime
despite newer battery technology.


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It would be, _if_ the battery runtime up to par. But it ain't.


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Somehow my impression is that very small laptops are usually overpriced.
Or the sales qties aren't there. Which may be because of too high
pricing. Kind of like the chicken and egg scenario.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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The degree to which this is an issue really depends on your usage
pattern.

Myself, when away from home I tend to turn the thing on for 15-20
minutes max of checking things online.

If I'm going to be using it for hours, I'm somewhere comfortable
already, so I plug it in.

If I were a frequent flier, had regular long train trips that weren't
on a city subway, etc then I might be using it for longer periods on
battery, and the battery endurance might be an issue.

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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I can't get any serious work done in that time frame. Such as creating a
50-page module spec or 10+ sheet schematic.


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On today's 103% booked out flights getting a seat with a power outlet is
like winning the lottery. Doesn't happen, usually.


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Well, that's exactly what I and many others want to use a laptop for. A
10 hour flight across an ocean, a 5 hour train ride, etc. The old Compaq
did that yet none of the "modern" ones after it were able to. I guess
that's called progress.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
On Thu, 22 May 2008 08:09:08 -0700 (PDT), cs snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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Can the Eee run standard linux or windows executables with out
recompiling?


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The one I have does.

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Why would I want that on a personal device. Dont you have better
things to do with your life?

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My point is, that if you are not a computer geek, what use does the
EeePC really have?

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?


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Yes. It is just a tiny PC.

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In summary: You don't have any use for an Eee. Other people do. There
is no point of contact between these two viewpoints, so there is no
perceptible reason for conflict and hence no purpose to your argument.

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?

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It's a small, light, low cost, portable media player / web browser /
email client.

You can work with Excel spreadsheets and Word documents. There are
many free linux applications preinstalled, including OpenOffice. You
can download others. Also it can run Windows and standard Windows
applications.

--

John Devereux

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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Yes, but unlike specialized devices that do those things, it's
fundamentally a general purpose computer.  If you don't like the
default for anything you can change it, either by installing different
programs or by modifying the installed programs.  And you don't even
need a cross-compile environment if you want to do that (I do tend to
use an external drive when compiling, though that's not strictly
necessary)

Most of the time mine is just a web client.  Occasionally I use it to
play videos.  Even more occasionally, I go in and modify mplayer to
add extra features.

Or to put it another way, it's the first laptop that was worth
spending personal funds on.  It's all the computer I really need 90%
of the time, and it's small enough that I have it with me 90% of the
time.

Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?



The Real Andy wrote:

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The original Linux-based Asus Eee runs standard linux
executables fine, no compiling required.  Not that
compiling is all that difficult in Linux.

The newer Windows-XP-based Asus Eee runs standard
Windows executables, just like any other XP box.

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Runs all standard Linux/Windows apps, screen big enough
to get work done, keyboard big enough for touch typing,
much smaller than other Laptops, solid state storage
(no hard disk to get damaged by rough handling), fits
on a standard airline tray with the seat in front fully
reclined, allows me to plug into a a USB keyboard/mouse,
large screen monitor and Eee power adaptor at home and
at work, powerful enough to run all standard business
applications and most engineering applications (I still
use a high-powered desktop for 3D CAD). Costs $299.99
to $499.99, depending on what model you buy.

--
Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com/


Re: So, you wanted a cheap notebook?
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Apples and oranges.  I have a laptop for that kind of stuff but
still carry a Newton MP2000 with me on a daily basis.  Small enough
to be pocketable and still big enough to be useful.  The extended
battery life (30 hours) makes it truly portable in that you can
use it heavily all week on a single set of AAs, which are no trouble
to replace if you do happen to run low.

90% of the time the principal use is to makes notes.  The ability
to sketch quick diagrams etc make the Newt much less distracting
in use than a regular PC.  Standard office type stuff, email, telnet
and basic web browing are all perfectly doable too, although the
platform is showing its age a little now.

--
Andrew Smallshaw
snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org

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