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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/12 16:15, Bob Milutinovic wrote:

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About six years ago, I had a group of local kids tell me they wanted to  
learn about computers, Okay, go and grab one of those cases over there  
and next you'll need of these motherboards. Suddenly 10 became none.
Problem solved.

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One of the magazine projects?

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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
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No, I was only a kid at the time, barely cutting my teeth in the world of  
electronics; it was a ready-made Tandy TRS-80  
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80 ), with a blazing-fast 1.77MHz Z80 CPU  
no less.

Winding forward a couple of years, I was considerably more capable with a  
soldering iron and was considering a Super-80 kit (with the possibility of a  
whole single S-100 expansion slot!)  
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Smith_Super-80_Computer ), but decided  
instead to pump my limited funds into an "expansion interface" for my  
computer so I could finally expand my RAM to 48Kb and add floppy controller  
and printer interface - and later a C.Itoh 80-column, 9-pin dot matrix  
printer.

That was back in the days when NLQ was unheard of, and I'm pretty sure the  
print speed of mine was around 40cps, as I remember lusting after the  
nearly-100cps Epson MX80 when it came out. No idea what the model number of  
that printer was (I only had it 3-4 months), but spending the past half-hour  
rummaging through both Google search and images failed to find anything  
resembling it.

--  
Bob Milutinovic
Cognicom


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style

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My first printer did uppercase only and serial. Slow as treacle but it  
printed...

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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12-Dec-12 7:48 PM, Bob Milutinovic wrote:

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I spent some time on the TRS-80 also Bob.

Have a look at:
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/is-this-australias-first-pc.html

I did a bit of a writeup there.

Don...


--  
Don McKenzie

$30 for an Olinuxino Linux PC:
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style

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chips like to day. <vbg>
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the memory... Try explaining that to the kids  
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time. Also featured a 250 baud cassette interface for  
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so wobbly that you'd get motion sickness if you tried  
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I built my first computer myself from an article in Electronics Australia.
My first 'computer' was the EA 'Baby' 2650, with a whopping 256 bytes of RAM
and a 110 baud TTY interface - so I also had to build the Applied Technology/ETI
dumb terminal (VDU) to use it! (The latter was far more complicated than the
former.)






Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/2012 1:55 PM, terryc wrote:
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Bureau of Stats had a CDC 3600, Seymore Cray's first attempt at a super  
computer. It had about 8000 PCBs, the shift network alone had just short  
of 500 boards. When it went wrong, it usually failed something like a  
double precision floating point multiply. Fixing it usually required a  
pack of cigarettes, a pot of coffee, a pile of logic diagrams a foot  
thick, the trusty Tektronix, and a whole lot of patience. None of this  
99.999% uptime in those days.

The Cyber had a whole lot less modules, but, if it went wrong, the first  
symptom was usually the screens going blank. You were then left with the  
ability to enter 12 12bit instructions through a panel of toggle  
switches, and thats all that you had to work with. Out with the  
Tektronix again.


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/12 11:21, yaputya wrote:

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Didn't work on my PC, total dud.
Shrug, just javascript according to the page source.
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We had the punch cards at Newcastle, except students were not suppsed to  
do that. Well outside alloted assignments. Seems a few took to them like  
ducks to water and demand/cost was far higher than budgeted. So they  
introduced terminals.


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up
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What OS?

There was an old teletype terminal to the ICL(???) mainframe running  
George II, then George III in my first and second year, but it was  
incredibly hard to use and first/second year students didn't have  
storage rights or even running rights. Apparently the few terminals  
slowed the old system down incredibly and it could do no other work  
other than service the few terminals.

They were however great as a mechanism for "computer art" production on  
clean white continuous 80 column paper. It took a while and few edits,  
but you once you had the final paper tape, you could produce as many  
girls on bar stools or whatever you wanted.

The ICL stayed around as the Fortan programers system and in later  
years, we had access to card punches to do our own program punching. It  
also ran Algol programs.


The new system was a DEC PDP 11/70 running RSTS(?). The DEC terminals  
used 9pin dot matrix printer onto lined 132 column paper. Students had  
an account and limited storage and access to basic programming and a  
pile of games like startrek and the like.


Science had requirements for doing a couple of programes on it, but it  
was generally a facility you could use and for a few of us explore. I  
even got as far as having my own tape of programs that I had collected.  
"Just don't draw attention to the lack of system security"

It eventually offered this new programming language called C over one  
summer break.

Maths unfortunately decided that mark sense cards were the way their  
students were going to do programming(Fortran) and you had to purchase  
your cards. Yer right, a good eraser and you just collected discards and  
scrubbed.

Meanwhile, back in the engineering labs, you wrote your program,  
"compiled it" and then loaded it bit by bit(well sixteen at a time) into  
the one PDP 11/45 and hopefully when you pressed the run key, it worked.





Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/2012 4:49 AM, Don McKenzie wrote:
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Ah yes, punched cards.

How I hated them!

Sylvia.

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
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Some loved them. I had to physically remove the 029  
and card reader so the dinosaurs couldn't keep using them.  

I still use them for writing on.  

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style

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At least you always had something to write on.  



Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 16/12/12 06:13, T.T. wrote:

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Try mark sense cards.

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They do eventually run out, unfortunately.


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12-December-2012 4:49 AM, Don McKenzie wrote:
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cool!

--  
rgds,

Pete
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