Search Google, 1960:s-style

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Search Google, 1960:s-style

Found this one on "alt.folklore.computers" newsgroup.

Should bring back memories for the people that worked with punch cards,  
and what I call real computers, that at least had flashing lights on the  
front panel. :-)

http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

Don...

--  
Don McKenzie

$30 for an Olinuxino Linux PC:
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
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Bah, nothing beats the sawmill-like sound of a dot matrix printer... First  
time I heard one was at the inaugural computer show in Sydney, in the  
basement of the Town Hall in 1979; thought they'd amalgamated the computer  
show with the woodworking expo!

Now that they've covered punch cards and TTYs though, they should go one  
step further and have both input AND output on punched tape ;-)

--  
Bob Milutinovic
Cognicom


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12-Dec-12 5:23 AM, Bob Milutinovic wrote:
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My first home printer was a WWII model 15 baudot teletype:
http://www.baudot.net/teletype/M15.htm

Between the shift case (when the whole carriage moved up or down) and  
the return mechanism, there was no hope that the family could possibly  
watch TV when I was printing. :-)

Don...


--  
Don McKenzie

$30 for an Olinuxino Linux PC:
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/2012 5:56 AM, Don McKenzie wrote:
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My first micro-computer was a National Scamp with an ASR-33 teletype for I/O

The original takes me back to fixing CDC 405 card readers and 415 high  
speed card punches. Thanks very much, I was trying to forget all that  
stuff :-)

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style


Bob Milutinovic schrieb:

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Hello,

but the sound of a chain printer for mainframes in the computing center  
beats even that easily....

Bye


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 14/12/12 03:56, Uwe Hercksen wrote:
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Good source of industrial deafness.
BTHT for a job and that ws from outside the print room..

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 14-Dec-12 10:05 AM, terryc wrote:
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I was locked in a mobile computer van for many years, with a pair of DEC  
LP20B Line Printers driven from a matching pair of DEC PDP 11/40s.

any yes, I am now going for a claim for industrial deafness.

Don...



--  
Don McKenzie

$30 for an Olinuxino Linux PC:
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style


. . .
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Humbug. The first dot matrix printer I encountered did not sound
anything like a sawmill. It was in fact in an IBM keypunch  machine,
used to print a human-readable version of what was punched along the
top edge of the card.  

Introduced in 026 keypunch (over 60 years ago!), it printed 5x7 dot
characters. Unlike later dot matrix printers it contrived to hit all
of the required pins to form a character at the same time, using a
fascinating mechanism called a code plate -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keypunch#IBM_024.2C_026_Card_Punches




Andy Wood
snipped-for-privacy@trap.ozemail.com.au

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
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Egad!

I certainly hope that was developed for alphanumeric output; if it was  
purely for numeric, it would've been a hell of a lot easier to simply have  
ten pre-formed digits (as did the "Nixie Tube").

It's amazing looking back at the ingeniousness of earlier generations of  
engineers, having to straddle both electronics and mechanics in order to get  
something done - something which seems so trivial these days.

--  
Bob Milutinovic
Cognicom


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style


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Corse it was.

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It was never purely numeric.

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Yeah, the ASR33 teletype was a mechanical monstrosity compared
with the printing terminals that replaced it like the LA36.  


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On Sat, 15 Dec 2012 03:48:14 +1100, "Rod Speed"

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The 32/33 was quite a neat and simple machine.  Or are you thinking of
the 28/35 machines - they were much more complicated!

--
Sell your surplus electronic components at http://ozcomponents.com
Search or browse for that IC, capacitor,
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style



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It sure could print alpha characters (but upper case only), as well as
some special characters like ( ) / * . , etc. There would have been no
pressing need for a "numeric only" printer on those keypunch machines
- to see why go to the search link given by Don at the start of this
thread, and observe what gets punched if you type 0123456789.  

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Yep. Any fool can come up with something like:

  if Temp  < Min then Min=Temp

But it took a really clever bloke to come up with the idea for the
old-style minimum and maximum thermometer.  
Andy Wood
snipped-for-privacy@trap.ozemail.com.au

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style

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As an old BOM dude, we used a minimum thermometer and a maximum thermomter  
as in 2. The minimum used a barbell that was dragged down with surface  
tension of the alcohol and the maximum used mercury and a thinner "neck"  
that caused the column to break and leave a part of the column above it to  
show max temp.
The min was reset with a magnet and the max by shaking/swinging to rejoin  
the mercury.


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style


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Still took a clever bloke to come up with those.  


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/12 04:49, Don McKenzie wrote:
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Nothing like it. It is a mythical theme from the media for people who  
weren't there.

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" Google60 - Search Mad Men Style. An art project to explore distances  
and heroism in user interfaces."
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Once again don spams usenet with crud.
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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12.12.12 09:20, terryc wrote:
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Funny though.

Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style

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what I call real computers, that at least had flashing
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Good one! Must have taken a lot of work to get it to work so well.

Back in the 70`s at Sydney Uni we had to use those bloody Hollerith cards,
you had to type your program into the puncher, collect the cards and feed 'em
into the card reader. You picked up the printout the next day, if there was a
mistake you had to do it all again. Fortunately for us poor engineering
students,
they soon introduced 'dumb terminals', a massive improvement but they were
really just thermal printers with a keyboard. Still, you were actually hooked up
to the Control Data Cyber 70 (I think that was the name) and you could even
play simple games despite such a rudimentary interface, Star Trek was very
popular with us engineers but wasted a lot of thermal paper.....



P.S.
Those interested in the above may also find this amusing...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bastard_Operator_From_Hell





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Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/2012 11:21 AM, yaputya wrote:
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what I call real computers, that at least had flashing
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students,
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up
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Just think of us poor sods of CDC customer engineers who had to fix all  
that stuff


Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
On 12/12/12 12:31, keithr wrote:

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but it was built from real components in those days and not a pile of  
bland chips like to day. <vbg>






Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style
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Yes, right down to the ferrite beads and hand-would enamelled copper wire  
for the memory... Try explaining that to the kids getting their IT diplomas  
these days!

My first computer had a whopping 4Kb of RAM. Yes, it _was_ whopping for that  
time. Also featured a 250 baud cassette interface for storage and a 64x16  
uppercase-only monochrome video output, fed to a monitor so wobbly that  
you'd get motion sickness if you tried too hard to focus on the writing.

--  
Bob Milutinovic
Cognicom


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