Remote switching by radio transceivers.

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View


Hi

I have an idea to remotely activate a switch by a radio transceiver. I
have two applications at this moment. One is for an irrigation sensor I
have invented. It works on evaporation and turns a switch on when a
container of water loses weight and overbalances an arm. It activates a
micro switch to do this. The sensor is best placed out in the field
under the sprinklers that replace the water. However, a problem for
some people is that a long length of cable has to be laid out between
the sensor and the solenoid valve that the switch turns on. I thought a
way to overcome the problem would be by using a common low cost radio
transceiver. There are some at
http://www1.electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID83%41&CATID=&keywords=radio+transceiver&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&SUBCATID =
or you can do a search for radio transceiver on
http://electusdistribution.com.au where I soon plan to place an order.
I also read in the catalogue that they are voice activated.

What I thought could be done is when the switch on the irrigation
sensor turns on it would activate a buzzer and also turn on another
switch wired into the transceiver to power it. The buzz would then be
heard on the receiver piece of the transceiver that would be back near
the solenoid valve. The receiver piece could hopefully be left on all
the time and maybe even powered by the mains to save batteries. The
buzz heard on the transceiver could then activate a sound sensing
switch that could then activate the solenoid. A concern could be that
the auto power off timer on the transceiver could cut power to the
transceiver.

I am also thinking of using a transceiver for a rain sensor I wrote
about in an earlier thread. A rain sensor could be placed about 3 km
away in the direction where the rain normally comes from. When the
sensor gets wet. It would sound a buzzer that would activate the voice
activated transceiver. The buzz would then be heard on the receiver
part of the transceiver that would be in my house. This would alert me
when a shower of rain is coming. When the rain sensor dries out the
buzzer would stop. A circuit diagram of the rain sensor connected to
the buzzer is at http://www.electronics-lab.com/projects/science/015/ .
 I would also need to have it power a heater at the same time as the
buzzer switches on. The heater would be placed under the sensor to
evaporate the water so that it will reset itself quickly after the rain
stops. The heater could consist of some resister wire wrapped around
some steel that is covered in insulation tape. Would the existing
circuit in the diagram with the SCR1 be able to also switch on a heater
or would a relay also be needed?

Would a transceiver be a good low cost way to remotely activate
switches like this?

For interest the irrigation sensor I invented is at
http://www.advantagein.com/irrigation /

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Quoted text here. Click to load it
http://www1.electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID83%41&CATID=&keywords=radio+transceiver&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&SUBCATID =
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I used to play around with the tranceivers used in controller doors. Cant
remember the brand (ademco???), but they had various models including one
with almost a k range. Just a small mod to adapt the transmitter, and the
receiver is an open cct board with a choice of momentary or latching
contacts. No need to muck around with sound sensors, just wire it directly
to the pump wiring via a hd relay.
Where a larger range is required, a modified CB UHF radio works wonders. I
set up a few to control boom gates to access remote coal mines.










Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.



Hi

Thanks for your letter.

For the first application I may be able to get away without a buzzer.
However, for the second application for the rain sensor I think I would
need buzzer. Don't you think so?

Do you think the units at http://electusdistribution.com.au would be
good for my purpose? If so, which ones should be ok or would any of
them be fine?

The info on 4 units http://electusdistribution.com.au is below.

Could you draw or do you know of how one would be directly wired in via
a Hd relay?




STOCK-CODE: DC1040   RRP: $89.00

40 Channel 1.5w UHF Pocket CB Radio


Our most powerful unit has a range of up to 8km, and with a 1.5W
output, it is certainly NO toy. This high-quality lightweight UHF
transceiver is ideal for use in many professional and leisure
activities, including hiking, camping, farming, building, inter-car
road trip communication, IT & Electrical installation. The savings made
over mobile phone calls would see these radios pay themselves off very
quickly indeed!
- Covers Australian 40 UHF CB channels and repeaters
- Green backlit LCD screen
- 1.5W maximum RF output
- Range up to 8km
- No license required
- Low / High power setting
- Fully compliant with Australian CommunicationAuthority guidelines
- ACA approved
- Uses 4 x AAA Ni-MH rechargeable batteries, not included (use our
SB-1723)
- Size: Body only 120(H) x 65(W) x 35(D)mm
- Antenna length 57mm.





STOCK-CODE: DC1010  RRP: $34.95

40 Channel UHF/CB Pocket Communicator


This lightweight handheld transceiver is suitable for all manner of
professional and leisure activities such as hiking, leisure, use on
building sites, IT-cablers, electricians, inter-car road trip
communication, farming, etc. Open field transmission range is up to an
incredible 5km, with typical city range up to one kilometre. Tested in
the light industrial area of our Silverwater headquarters in Sydney,
and we achieved a clear range of over 4 blocks.
- Covers Australian 40 UHF CB channels and repeaters
- Green backlit LCD screen
- 0.5W maximum RF output
- Range up to 5km
- No license required
- Uses 4 x AAA Ni-MH rechargeable batteries, not included (use our
SB-1739)
- Size; body only 105(H) x 60(W) x 35(D)mm.
- Antenna length 50mm.





 STOCK-CODE: DC1025   RRP: $59.95

40 Channel UHF Pocket CB Radio


With the tremendous success of our DC-1010 transceiver, it is no wonder
that it has been enhanced with even more features, and in a much more
compact design. Features a recharging base that charger two
transceivers simultaneously, so their ready to go when you are.
Secondly, it has a 4 step scrambling function which allows you to
communicate privately on what is normally a "public" broadcast.
Includes one transceiver and charging base. Each transceiver is
supplied with a rechargeable 650mAH pack however 3 x AAA batteries can
be used in emergencies. Available accessories are hands free earpiece
(DC-1039), 12VDC Car Charger (DC-1036), and VOX Headset (DC-1032, see
page 17).
- UHF FM transmission
- No license required
- 500mW output power
- Up to 5km transmission range
- 40 Channels and 38 sub-codes
- Babysitter and monitor function
- Dual watch function
- VOX function
- Auto power off timer
- Stop watch function
- Electronic volume
- Repeater function
- Automatic squelch function
- Battery level indicators
- Key lock function
- Key tone function
- LCD back-light function
- Support external headset
- Support external AC-DC charger
- ACA approval
One Transceiver with Charging Cradle Cat. DC-1025
Extra Transceiver with Battery only Cat. DC-1028
Spare Battery to Suit Cat. DC-1029




STOCK-CODE: DC1028  RRP: $49.95

40 Channel UHF Pocket Radio


(Image shown is the DC-1025 model)With the tremendous success of our
DC-1010 transceiver, it is no wonder that it has been enhanced with
even more features, and in a much more compact design. Features a
recharging base that charger two
transceivers simultaneously, so their ready to go when you are.
Secondly, it has a 4 step scrambling function which allows you to
communicate privately on what is normally a "public" broadcast.
Includes one transceiver and charging base. Each transceiver is
supplied with a rechargeable 650mAH pack however 3 x AAA batteries can
be used in emergencies. Available accessories are hands free earpiece
(DC-1039), 12VDC Car Charger (DC-1036), and VOX Headset (DC-1032, see
page 17).
- UHF FM transmission
- No license required
- 500mW output power
- Up to 5km transmission range
- 40 Channels and 38 sub-codes
- Babysitter and monitor function
- Dual watch function
- VOX function
- Auto power off timer
- Stop watch function
- Electronic volume
- Repeater function
- Automatic squelch function
- Battery level indicators
- Key lock function
- Key tone function
- LCD back-light function
- Support external headset
- Support external AC-DC charger
- ACA approval
One Transceiver with Charging Cradle Cat. DC-1025
Extra Transceiver with Battery only Cat. DC-1028
Spare Battery to Suit Cat. DC-1029
 
  


Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

What range are you looking at?


 However, for the second application for the rain sensor I think I would
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi

Thanks for your letter.

For the first application for the irrigation sensor it would probably
be less than 500 meters

For the second application for the rain sensor, I am thinking of
possibly about 3km.

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Quoted text here. Click to load it
http://www1.electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID83%41&CATID=&keywords=radio+transceiver&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&SUBCATID =
Quoted text here. Click to load it

how about the a 433Mhz transmitters/receiver pair like
jaycar cat# ZW-3100, ZW-3102

under $10 each.

they should have 50-100m range with just the straight antenna,
and much more with directional antenna. (like a UHF TV antenna that covers the
the frequency they use)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

using CB radios for remote controls may not be legal...

Bye.
   Jasen

Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


another unpaid net cop!
who gives a fuck

:
: using CB radios for remote controls may not be legal...
:
: Bye.
:   Jasen

Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi Jasen or whoever can help

Thanks for the info

Do you know what range the 433Mhz transmitters/receiver pair like
jaycar cat# ZW-3100, ZW-3102

I looked at a file on the site but could not see it.

How hard would they be to wire up? Would they be harder than the
earlier complete units I referred to? Also, would they have any
disadvantages to the earlier units that I posted data on above?

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I would find them easier to wire up... they have an output that can be used to
drive a transistor to operate a relay, no messing with buzzers and sound
detectors, no hassle if the CB transmitter won't stay locked to your chosen
frequency when the power is disconnected...


another advantaage is the lower power consumption,
one disadvantage is probably much reduced range.

they are designed to send data, but will work just sending a carrier (empty
radio signal)

to find out if they're suitably you may need to buy a pair and do some
experiments. unless you can figure out how well the antennas in the document
(or others you may substitute) will work. I recall a sensitivity figure for
the receiver.

someoone who understands the theory behind transmitters, antennas and
receivers caqn probably tell you what sort of range you could get.

I can guess, but that's all.


--

Bye.
   Jasen

Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi Jason or whoever can help

Thanks for the info.

Could you possibly draw a circuit diagram or know where I could find
one of how the 433 MHz transmitters/receiver could be wired up for my
purpose?

It is probably easier to email me. My address is
weather at truesolutions.info
or you can go to http://weather.org.au /

Do you know who may know more about them or who could help me wire them
up?

Perhaps an antenna could be connected to them to extend the range.

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


It might be worthwhile reading the Silicon Chips article (earlier this
year) on using these modules - IIRC they were able to get well over a km
range, but do not rely on my memory - check out their article for yourself

David

" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi

Thanks for your letter.

Do you know the address of the webpage where I can find the article?

Do you know anyone who could help me make up the circuit or do you know
of any circuit diagrams of how it could be wired up for my purpose?

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


On 20 Apr 2006 06:38:24 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Have a look at Silicon Chip November 2003 issue. There is an article
'Smart radio modem for microcontrollers' which should explain all you
need. The author also supplies kits. If you can't find SC in the
library, get onto the SC website - siliconchip.com.au - the publishers
can supply either a copy of the article or the whole magazine.

Dave

Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.



Hi

Thanks for your letter.

Is all the information in the link at
http://siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_30806/article.html ?

However, I do not see a circuit diagram like in another Nov 2003
article at  http://siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_30810/article.html

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


On 20 Apr 2006 20:29:33 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you bother to read the first page fully, you will see  a line
saying "click here for online access to the rest of this article" - if
you click on this you can then buy online access to this article for
$8.80.

How much more hand holding do you need ?

Dave

Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi

Thanks for the info. The problem is I do not know much about
electronics and have an enormous amount of projects to do and do not
get time to make these things up. I would rather pay someone to make up
the kit for me. They may also know of where the information can be
freely found. I thought there may be many places where such information
can be freely found which would be easier. Do you have any ideas of
where I can search or who could help me make these things up?

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Well gee whiz Richard - the other Dave and I have given you all the info
you need to obtain an article complete with circuit etc on how to do what
you want - need your bum wiped too?

David

" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


The December 2005 issue of Siliconship has an article on the use of small
xmitter/rec modules (the $10 ones from Jarcar) complete with a circuit to
interface them with a PICAXE microcontroller.

They obtained a range of about 1km using a coat hanger antenna

David

Dave Goldfinch wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


www.siliconchip.com.au

David

" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Remote switching by radio transceivers.


Hi David or who can help

Thanks for your info on the range of the system. However, it would be
better if it worked for 2 or 3 km line of sight for the rain sensor and
by the looks of it the transmitter that you mention does not do that.
However, the one you mention would be good for the irrigation sensor.
The problem is as I said I do not have electronics experience and would
need someone to help me make it up. Also I have so many other projects
so time does not allow me to do the electronics. If you know anyone
that can help, please let me know.

For the rain sensor and maybe even the irrigation sensor I thought it
could be easier if I went back to my original idea and just bought the
transceivers that are made up. There are some at
http://www1.electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID83%41&CATID=&keywords=radio+transceiver&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&SUBCATID =
or you can do a search for radio transceiver on
http://electusdistribution.com.au where I soon plan to place an order.
I also read in the catalogue that they are voice activated.

A leaf wetness sensor could be placed about 3 km away in the direction
where the rain normally comes from. When the sensor gets wet. It could
sound a buzzer that would activate the voice activated transceiver. The
buzz would then be heard on the receiver part of the transceiver that
would be in my house. This would alert me when a shower of rain is
coming. When the rain sensor dries out the buzzer would stop. A circuit
diagram of the rain sensor connected to the buzzer is at
http://www.electronics-lab.com/projects/science/015/ .  I would also
need to have it power a heater at the same time as the buzzer switches
on.

This may save a lot of wiring up. What do you think?

Your help is appreciated,
Regards Richard.


Site Timeline