Re: Daggy soldering

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:I have a Weller soldering iron, with replaceable tips. It is more than
:thirty years old, I think, and I am more than thirty years older than I was
:when I bought it. Between us (Weller and I) we don't seem to be able to
:solder anything without the tip dragging a dag of solder with it as I remove
:the iron.
:Is there a simple, fixable, reason for this? I hope the answer is not merely
:a loss of dexterity on my part. New tips? New iron? If so, what sort of
:iron. It doesn't have to last another thirty years.
:


First try a new tip (700F is usual)

If that doesn't fix it the problem is either the heater element (part TC208) or
the switch unit (part SW60). Both of these items are quite expensive (around
$100 for both together). You can buy a brand new Weller WTCPN for just over
double that so you might be better off buying a new soldering station.

Re: Daggy soldering

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Thanks. The tips have a single-digit number  on the flat end. I have 6, 7,
and 8.
The unit makes regular clicking noises that I imagine is the temperature
control.
The problem does seem to be independent of which tip I am using.
After all these years, is Weller still the ideal choice?



Re: Daggy soldering

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Not the old fixed temp tip type Weller, they are considered somewhat
archaic.
You really should have a proper variable temp iron, they are much more
versatile.
You can get proper variable temp Wellers which aren't bad.
Hakko (936) is probably the most popular low-ish cost brand in the industry.

Dave.



Re: Daggy soldering

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The solder is 60% tin, 38% lead and 2% copper. DSE. Old.

Curiously, one result of Googling Hakko 936 sends me to Jaycar's catalogue,
to a Duratech soldering station at $99 that doesn't look much like a Hakko.
Here in the bush it boils down to mail order (Jaycar, Altronics) or a one
hour drive to Dick Smith. I don't share the widespread scorn heaped on DSE.
They do sell a lot of crap, but they sell some remarkably good stuff too.
The local staff don't know a lot but they are helpful and seem eager to
learn. They have a surprising range of components that are well organised
and competently catalogued. I remember the old days when the Bespectacled
One was moved to tears at the sight of an Australian flag and then flogged
imported CB radios that shared few frequencies with the local regulations,
modems that lasted three months, and less-than-wonderful kits.
My only real gripe with DSE is the relentless, deafening, all-pervasive
music(?) that demonstrates better than anything just how poor their
bottom-of-the-range audio systems are. It is like being in a 19-year-old's
first car.



Re: Daggy soldering

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If you want to go with computronics, call them, a guy called Kevin Dare does
the tools/components, he's  good guy. Costs $5 or $10 delivery no problems.

I've no relationship other than as a customer. They are also good for
kinsten pcb materials, lcds, pcb drills.....



Re: Daggy soldering

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http://electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID79%13&CATID29%&keywords=&SPECIAL=&formCA%T&SUBCATID19%8
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Google Australia was down down for me yesterday morning as well.
Google.com worked fine.

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The only difference is the "ESD" version uses anti-static material on the
body, lead and iron handle. i.e. it does not accumulate a static charge.
Nothing most users need to worry about really.
If you find the normal white version cheaper, then grab it.

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Yep, it certainly will, you can use "lead free" tips with lead based solder
no problems.
The only difference with "lead free capabable" iron tips is that they are
better to last longer with less corrosion at higher temps etc when used with
lead free solder. And they don't come supplied with an initial lead based
solder coating.

This might help:
http://www.hakkousa.com/leadfree.asp

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You can't go wrong with reputable ones like Farnell, RS, Digikey, Mouser
etc.

Dave.



Re: Daggy soldering

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http://electusdistribution.com.au/productView.asp?ID79%13&CATID29%&keywords=&SPECIAL=&formCA%T&SUBCATID19%8
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Thank you.

Hakko it is.



Re: Daggy soldering
put finger to keyboard and composed:

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It appears that Google has changed its user interface. For anyone who
misses the old search interface for the Google Groups archive, here is
my workaround:
http://groups.google.com/group/sci.electronics.repair/msg/fa136e589573f29e?dmode=source

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.

Re: Daggy soldering

"Ross Herbert"
 "L.A.T."
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** Huh  ???

L.A.T.'s problem is probably that he is using bloody stupid 99% tin "lead
free" solder  !!

Makes you have to wipe to tip EVERY SINGLE time you use it.


BTW:

Where did the original post appear  ?

No sign of it on Google Groups nor my usual news server.



.....   Phil






Re: Daggy soldering

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I can see it on my Bigpond news server. But LAT did post using the Bigpond
server, so you think that'd be a given :->

Dave.



Re: Daggy soldering

:
:"Ross Herbert"
: "L.A.T."
:>
:> :I have a Weller soldering iron, with replaceable tips. It is more than
:> :thirty years old, I think, and I am more than thirty years older than I
:> was
:> :when I bought it. Between us (Weller and I) we don't seem to be able to
:> :solder anything without the tip dragging a dag of solder with it as I
:> remove
:> :the iron.
:> :Is there a simple, fixable, reason for this? I hope the answer is not
:> merely
:> :a loss of dexterity on my part. New tips? New iron? If so, what sort of
:> :iron. It doesn't have to last another thirty years.
:> :
:>
:>
:> First try a new tip (700F is usual)
:>
:> If that doesn't fix it the problem is either the heater element (part
:> TC208) or
:> the switch unit (part SW60).
:
:
:** Huh  ???
:
:L.A.T.'s problem is probably that he is using bloody stupid 99% tin "lead
:free" solder  !!
:
:Makes you have to wipe to tip EVERY SINGLE time you use it.

I wasn't aware of the solder type being used since it wasn't stated by the OP.
But if this is the case then it is no wonder he can't get a good soldered joint.

For the hobbyist electronics enthusiast there is no significant environmental
advantage in using lead-free solder so my advice would be to stick with 60-40
mildly activated flux solder.

:
:
:BTW:
:
:Where did the original post appear  ?
:
:No sign of it on Google Groups nor my usual news server.
:
:
:
:.....   Phil
:
:
:
:

Re: Daggy soldering

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I agree with that.

Also, a key to good soldering is to use fine solder. I'm amazed at how some
people still use the 1mm+ stuff and complain that they can't solder SMD
parts or get too much solder on the joint etc.
0.56mm or smaller is the go, it allows you to better control the amount of
solder being applied to the joint.

As for tips, forget the conical type, a small chisel is the best general
purpose tip for PCB work.

Dave.



Re: Daggy soldering

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Thank you for the description of the Weller and its tips. It is all coming
back to me. The solder I am using is indeed old, but shiny. It is thin, much
thinner than some other solder I have which is labeled 0.91mm. The tip I am
using is a replacement: Number 7 with a fine point. All the other tips are
grotty and rusty. I will get a chisel and see what happens.



Re: Daggy soldering

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Chisel's fine. I've never been fond of conical points. But get some
fresh solder too. I'm not sure if the resin core has a best-before
date but a new tip and fresh solder must get decent results. I'm just
trying to steer you clear from another disappointing try-and-see
experiment. By doing both at once and tasting success you'll be more
inspired to narrow down the problem!

I for one will be interested to hear where you finally put the blame.

John

Re: Daggy soldering

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I think my first mistake was switching to a pointed tip in the belief that
the stuff I was soldering was small and needed a small tip.
Ihave dredged up an old chisel-shaped tip and cleaned it up and the
improvement is immediate. I will get a new tip just like it. It is also a
hotter tip than the pointed tip, and that seems to improve things too. I
have some new solder (60/40) and it seems to be better too. Yes, the solder
I was using was something like twenty years old. Finally, I went back to
using a wet sponge tip-cleaner. I had been persuaded to use a little tub of
metal turnings instead.
When I moved to the bush about twenty years ago, I stocked up on all sorts
of things. Solder was one of them. I actually still have an unopened roll.
Dick Smith I think.
So I haven't really finally placed the blame, but my soldering is acceptably
dag-free and I am satisfied.
But I do know whom to thank. Once again I am indebted to the regulars on
this newsgroup.
Thank you all.



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