Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors - Page 2

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Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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   You can find websites that say anything you want them to.  I do use
some CFLs where I don't have to stay for more than a few minutes and I
despise them. "DO NOT USE BASE UP!!!"  That eliminates a lot of
fixtures.  "DO NOT USE IN AN ENCLOSED SPACE!!!"  There goes the outdoor
lights.  I do not like the color temperature of CFLs, or a lot of other
light sources. LED Lights give me headaches.  Go preach to your choir of
greenies.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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   It won't make any difference but if the capacitors are failing, use
105° or 125° replacements for longer life.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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the glass envelope.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
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Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors


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See my question regarding this, elsewhere in the thread

Arfa


Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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glass is ~75% silicon dioxide.

compare a lamp envelope to a LED silicon substrate,and there's no doubt
about which has more silicon. At least to the rational folks.
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Wiki is your friend.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon
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from Wiki;
Silicon is commercially prepared by the reaction of high-purity silica with
wood, charcoal, and coal, in an electric arc furnace using carbon
electrodes. At temperatures over 1,900 °C (3,450 °F), the carbon reduces
the silica to silicon according to the following chemical equation:

(not semiconductor-grade Si,that uses trichlorosilane.)
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--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
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Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors


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Ah. OK. I never was much of a chemist at school. I didn't realise that
silica sand was was basically silicon dioxide. Although I suppose the name
is a bit of a giveaway, with hindsight ...    :-)

Still, even so with that being the case, it's a bit of a distortion to liken
this compounded silicon which is there naturally, to the pure silicon that
has been processed out of the sand, for use in semiconductors.

Arfa


Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
On Thu, 22 Sep 2011 02:39:42 +0200, Sjouke Burry

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Zone melting is no longer used (it was popular in the early Germanium
days).  Today they react sand with Chlorine to get SiCl4 or with Hydrogen
to get SiH4 (silane).  Then they use distillation to get to parts per
trillion purity.  Maybe a dopant is added at this point.  Then react it
back to pure metal.  That then goes into a Cockrozski crystal puller.
Slice the boule into wafers and now the nasty chemicals start.  Buffered
HF, arsine, borane and worse.  And along the way a lot of energy.

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Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
On Wed, 21 Sep 2011 10:17:15 +0100, "Arfa Daily" =

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Some of the early CFL had/have an excess of green in their spectrum.  Not
so much of a problem today.

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