Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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"Jamie" = Maynard A. Philbrook, radio ham KA1LPH and total fuckwit


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** Wot absurd craplogy.





....  Phil





Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

"Stupider than Anyone Else on Earth "
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** There are no fairies left at the bottom of this mad bitch's garden.

    They all vacated decades ago in acute embarrassment.





....  Phil



Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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What ever you think of the question (stupid, incomplete, a waste of time
etc), she did NOT ask you. A question is not an excuse for you to insult
anyone. If you don't like it don't answer

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

"larry moe 'n curly"

Another problem is opening up the CFL to get to the circuit board and
reattaching the cover because regular glues don't work, and you want a
strong bond that won't fail at high temperature.


** Most CFLs use no glue at all, the halves snap fit together.

 Silicone adhesive ( eg Silastic) will handle the case temp easily -  can be
used to secure loose glass tubes in the case too.




....  Phil









Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors


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The only ones I've tried opening are old large MaxLite (in the photo)
and 5-year-old 14W Commercial Electric (now Home Depot's brand), and
both were glued.  I opened them by carefully sawing around the
perimeter.  I ended up using a fine-tooth coping saw because my Dremel
abrasive cutoff wheel gummed up with plastic.  If the CFLs are snapped
together, how do we unsnap them?

I know silicone rubber glue can take the heat, but is it strong
enough?  I worry about it coming loose when somebody screws in the
bulb, causing the bulb wires (magnet wire - only enamel insulation) to
short.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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can be


Last time I looked that's what they stuck 'em in with in the first place.



Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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Can those who have opened them up tell us how best to do it and what
usually dies? I am amassing a collection of duds that didn't reach
anywhere near their promised lifetime (especially the more expensive
higher wattage ones) and I'm idly curious as to what use could be made
of them. From Larry's photo, there's quite a bit of electronics in
there, (which incidentally makes one wonder whether their lifetime
energy saving is really as high as is claimed, but that's another
matter).

Chris

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
On Sep 21, 1:39A0%am, chrisj.doran% snipped-for-privacy@gtempaccount.com
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They will happily run a normal (straight or circular) fluro without
any electrical problems, and would save power compared to an ironcore
ballast.

If you were going to do this and fit them in a standard batten, I
would replace the electrolytics with a decent name brand first as the
cheap caps are unlikely to last the many, many years that a typical
household batten does..

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors


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Best use that could be made of them is to grind 'em up and use them for
hardcore for road building  ...   :-)

Arfa


Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors


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So why do some CFLs keep the brightness more constant than others?

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Aren't LEDs also temperature sensitive?  Because I had a hot chassis
TV with optical couplers for the composite video and audio, and the
picture brightness & contrast would change slightly when it warmed
up.  There were also pots to adjust the couplers.


Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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**I can't answer that question. All the ones I use are fine.

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**In the same sense that all semiconductors are, yes. Any decent LED
lighting manufacturer will take care of cooling.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
Perhaps the greater issue will be failure of the lead-free solder due to
internal temperatures in new designs of LED lighting which will be intended
to replace a common lamps of significant wattage.

Powerful LEDs also create heat, and when a lot of 'em are fit into a small
package, the heat will very likely be a reason for very short life from the
new technology.

Combining the lead-free solder with the cheapest manufacturer that exists
will probably reduce the projected (dreamed) lifetimes from 10 years to
maybe 2 years.

At about $30 each (and it's likely more of them will be needed to reach
comfortable lighting levels), the greatest benefit these lamps will have,
will be separating consumers from their money.

Anyone that's been servicing consumer electronic gear in the past several
decades has seen the impact that heat has on solder connections, and more
recently, the widespread failures of lead-free solders.

--
Cheers,
WB
.............


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Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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It would be a huge hassle to get the case apart, and back together
again, and I can't see it making any difference whatsoever.


All the CFL's I have here that have failed, it is always the tube that
is the cause.  The electronics - including the filter capacitor are
always fine, so there isnt any point in replacing it even for
longevity reasons.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
"kreed"

It would be a huge hassle to get the case apart, and back together
again,

** Pretty easy with most I have bought .

All the CFL's I have here that have failed, it is always the tube that
is the cause.  The electronics - including the filter capacitor are
always fine, so there isnt any point in replacing it even for
longevity reasons.

** Generally, the electronics outlasts the tubes  -  but that is only
because the tube fails so quickly, like a few hundred up to 2000 hours at
most.  I have a collection now of CFLs that are slow to come on, flicker or
have lost 40% of their light output.

The electronics will fail early if the CFL gets hot in use because it is
inside a small light fitting  -  like an Oyster or spherical ceiling lamp.

http://www.onlinelighting.com.au/images/products/Omega/Deluxe_Oyster_17_5cm.jpg



....  Phil






Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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http://www.dealextreme.com/p/12w-3500k-800lm-warm-white-led-emitter-metal-strip-12-14v-80310
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**CFLs are not so different to regular fluoros. Each manufacturer has
his/her own formulation for the phosphor coating. As a conseqence, the
colour balance will be slightly different for each. I find that different
lamps have different purposes. For my workbench, I need accurate colour
rendition (for checking colour codes on components) and I use 36 Watt, quad
phosphor lamps for that purpose. For other areas, I use different lamps.

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**Well, yes.

 If the first
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**They are available in a wide range of colour temperatures. The range is
increasing rapidly.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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   Who makes 100 watt heat pumps, that will work at -40°?


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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   There are some in the US that have been on 24/7 for decades, and
still work.   Some are over 100 years old.  Cheap bulbs don't last, and
neither do those that are used improperly.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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**Indeed. The ways to get incandescents to last a long time are well known.
They are simply under-run massively. IOW: Use a 280VAC rated lamp at 240VAC
and the thing will last MUCH longer. Of course, colour temperature edges
much closer towards the red and efficiency is absolute crap.

 Cheap bulbs don't last,
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**Not so different to CFLs and LEDs. Funny about that.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors

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   Still doesn't prove your lame assed claim that incandescents don't
last.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: CFLs - retrofitting low ESR capacitors
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**I don't need to prove it. It has been well documented:

http://www.megavolt.co.il/Tips_and_info/bulbs_at_glance.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_fluorescent_lamp#Lifespan

http://www.designrecycleinc.com/led%20comp%20chart.html

http://www.gelighting.com/eu/resources/firstlight/module04/08.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamp_rerating

This is an interesting primer on the topic:

http://donklipstein.com/bulb1.html


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



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