Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London - Page 6

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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
On Sun, 23 Jan 2011 13:46:54 +1100

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    Well that didn't take long this time.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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He's been practicing a lot in sci.physics over the last 6 days.
Boring!

/BAH

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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Wait for it ... no one's called anyone a Nazi, yet.

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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They had innovations, but any in computing eh Roddles????????



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
snipped-for-privacy@eircom.net (Ahem A Rivet's Shot) writes:

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At least he's chosen new catchphrases.

--
/~\   snipped-for-privacy@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
\ /  I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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Not really.  He's writing the same old shit he spews
in other newsgroups.

/BAH

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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Roddles google ms dos the beginning
In 1980, IBM first approached Bill Gates and Microsoft, to discuss the state
of home computers and Microsoft products. Gates gave IBM a few ideas on what
would make a great home computer, among them to have Basic written into the
ROM chip. Microsoft had already produced several versions of Basic for
different computer system beginning with the Altair, so Gates was more than
happy to write a version for IBM.

As for an operating system (OS) for the new computers, since Microsoft had
never written an operating system before, Gates had suggested that IBM
investigate an OS called CP/M (Control Program for Microcomputers), written
by Gary Kildall of Digital Research. Kindall had his Ph.D. in computers and
had written the most successful operating system of the time, selling over
600,000 copies of CP/M, his OS set the standard at that time.

Gee whiz Roddles wrong again. History not your strong point.....





Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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re:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2011b.html#3 Rare Apple I computer sells for
$216,000 in London

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Kildall

gone 404 ... but lives on the wayback machine
http://web.archive.org/web/20071011100440/http://www.khet.net/gmc/docs/museum/en_cpmName.html

kildall using cp67/cms at npg school (wiki mentions he fulfilled draft
obligation by teaching at npg)

melinda's virtual machine history going back to science center, cp40 &
cp67.
http://web.me.com/melinda.varian /

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virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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DOS 1.0 was *very* much like CP/M, enough so that Kildall used the
similarity as leverage to get IBM to agree to sell CP/M for the PC as
well.  DOS 2.0 was a total rewrite. -- Joe
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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they could if they ever decided to.

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MS.

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Nothing like a COPY of CP/M.

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Thats not how that happened. If it really was a COPY of CP/M, he would have sued
and won.

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It was never a COPY of CP/M or even close either.

If it had been, there would have been no need for different versions of the
apps.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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they could if they ever decided to.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/86-DOS

The most it did was share an api structure etc and had
significant changes in the detail with how CP/M operated,
most obviously with the automatic flushing to disk etc.

Nothing like a COPY of CP/M, it just used a
similar API so it was easy to port apps to it etc.

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sued and won.

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apps.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 03:55:35 +1100, "Rod Speed"

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I know. I wasn't aware, for the first couple of months I used it, but
now I keep it that way on purpose to annoy pedants. Works great!

Your flaming skillz are rubbish, btw.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

"hey let's educate the brutes, we know we are superior to them anyway,
just through genetics, we are gentically superior to the working
class. They are a shaved monkey. If we educate them, they will be able
to read instructions, turn up on time and man the conveyor belts,
sorted."     #    

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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You wouldnt know what a real flame was if your lard arse was on fire.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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Yet IE is still trying to catch up to Firefox.


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No truer words were ever spoken.

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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Irrelevant to whether there has been any INNOVATION with IE.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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Of course IE has innovated.  How do you think all the security holes got
in there?

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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You make a good point here, actually.  I mean, a serious one.

I believe Microsoft's decision to build a mail client which would
instantly execute code from incoming email without any sort of user
interaction was, in fact, a pure innovation.  No one had ever done it
before that I know of.

Basically, Microsoft single-handedly invented the botnet and the email
virus.  Actually, I'm not quite sure that's fair.  Technically, the GOOD
TIMES jokers *invented* the email virus, as an abstract concept, but
Microsoft was by far the first company to actually implement the necessary
infrastructure.

-s
--
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
On 23 Jan 2011 20:28:15 GMT

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    Hmm good point - I remember telling people that the idea of a virus
that spread by email was a myth not long before Microsoft did that.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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there was xmas exec on bitnet in nov87 ... vmshare archive
http://vm.marist.edu/~vmshare/browse?fn=CHRISTMA&ft=PROB
old risk digest
http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/5.81.html#subj1

almost exactly a year before morris worm (nov88)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_worm

the xmas exec is basically social engineering ... distributing a
compromised executable and getting people to load & execute.

this is slightly different from convention for automatic execution.
that grew up with various office applications that evolved on local,
private, safe, closed business networks. this infrastructure was then
transferred to the wild anarchy of the internet w/o the necessary safety
and countermeasures (aka just reading an email could result in automatic
execution)

bitnet (along with EARN in europe) was higher education network (significantly
underwritten by IBM and using similar technology that was used for the
corporate internal network) ... past posts mentioning bitnet &/or earn
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#bitnet

some old email by person charged with setting up EARN:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#email840320

the internal network was larger than the arpanet/internet from just
about the beginning until possibly late '85 or early '86. misc.
past posts mentioning internal network
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#internalnet

I was blamed for online computer conferencing on the internal network in
the late 70s and early 80s. The folklore is that when the executive
committee was told about online computer conferencing (and the internal
network), 5of6 wanted to fire me.

Later, somewhat as a result, a research was paid to study how I
communicated ... got copies of all my incoming & outgoing email, logs of
all my instant messages, sat in the back of my office for nine months
taking notes face-to-face and phone conversations (sometimes went with
me to meetings). This also turned into stanford phd thesis and material
for some number of papers and books. misc. past posts
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/subnetwork.html#cmc

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970