Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London - Page 15

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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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write on.
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pockets.
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but thinner an with the company logo as
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That shows you more as an old fart than a geek.

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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pockets.

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Nope, just shows they are convenient to write on.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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I saw one yesterday. I'm using it as a bookmark.


--
Today is Setting Orange, the 43rd day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3176
                      "Always mount a scratch monkey."

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
snipped-for-privacy@bigpond.com (T.T.) writes:

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:-)  Those cards were my nerd badge, which I wore proudly.

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On the other hand, it was there and it worked - which put it
miles ahead of anything which sounded nice but which either
didn't exist yet or was prohibitively expensive.

--
/~\   snipped-for-privacy@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
\ /  I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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More importantly, it could be fixed.  Looking at magtape
took a bit god who didn't mind going blind.  ;-)

/BAH

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on.

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Anyone with even half a clue has backups.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London

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which is why people used the label fields on the cards.



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Thats not a backup and is completely useless if someone loses the whole box of
cards.



Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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The "covered wagon" helped settle the American west. Just because
the "covered wagon" was *not* a steam train or an airplane, that
is *no* reason that one should curse the "covered wagon".

Those computer cards are a big part of what got us where we are
today. It seems mighty ungrateful for anyone to curse or revile
them... If it's part of one's "right of passage" to throw the past
into the trash bin, one might consider these things.

--
+----------------------------------------+
|     Charles and Francis Richmond       |
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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One of the things I've been thankful for having started when cards were
still in use is that I've never had any problem understanding files, records
or fields.  When you could hold the "records" in your hand and look at the
"fields" on the card it became very clear.  I've used this to teach the
concepts several times.  Most recently, I had to bring up some pictures of
cards on the screen because the student had never seen any.  But when I did
they got an instant "Oh, yeah!"  Of course, "do not bend, fold, spindle, or
mutilate" didn't mean anything to her, but that's the way it goes.

    - Bill


Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
Bill snipped-for-privacy@msn.com (Bill Leary) writes:

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"Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it."
  -- George Santayana

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And if there was too much data to fit on a single card, you suffered
the nightmare of needing multiple physical records to hold a single
logical record.  Awareness of this has a good influence on data design.

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You could always explain it as a form of data corruption, right down
to the level of a spindle hole flipping a single bit.

--
/~\   snipped-for-privacy@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
\ /  I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
((..portions omitted..))
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Since I often work in embedded systems, some with very limited memory, this
has come back to me fairly often.  Instead of making records big enough to
handle the worst case, I can make them big enough to handle the common case,
saving a lot of memory, then usually with a single bit indicate "look to
next record for more of this record's data" or other tricks to that effect.
Using extra space only when actually necessary.

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I don't recall that I ever needed to into that, but yes, that would work.

    - Bill


Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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Or you made each input record self-contained.  We did that with our
USAGE data spec (computer usage data for downstream billing programs).
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It hadn't occurred to me (before Bill's post) that cards helped
concepts of the unseen bits...but they did.

/BAH

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
(Charles Richmond) writes:

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s/right/rite/

On second thought, given the modern culture of entitlement,
perhaps you're right after all...

--
/~\   snipped-for-privacy@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
\ /  I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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Perhaps I was wearing my "Freudian slip"...   ;-)

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Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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If you wanted to be really nerdy, you carried the dummy cheques that IBM
provided to test their cheque sorters as note pads. I found one the
other day stuck in an old programming manual as a bookmark.

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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When I was at Burroughs, I was out in Atlanta training some folks on the
new medium systems MCP, and was testing the reader-sorter code;  the test
checks were cancelled employee paychecks from other sites - found several
old checks for current colleagues.

scott

Re: Rare Apple I computer sells for $216,000 in London
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I liked handling cards.  I hated handling papertape.  I would rather
have my data in cards than on magtape.

Cards were great; DECtapes were the best.

/BAH

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I got summer job at the univ. doing port of 1401 MPIO to 360
assembler. The univ. had 709 with 1401 front-end for doing unit-record;
cards were read to tape on 1401 and the tape moved to 709 tape
drive. the 709 did tape-to-tape processing and the resulting output tape
was moved to 1401 tape drive for output to printer/punch (MPIO was 1401
program that handle card-to-tape and tape-to-printer/punch).

As part of eventually replacing the 709/1401 with 360/67, a 360/30 was
brought in to replace the 1401. While 360/30 had 1401 hardware emulation
mode and could run MPIO directly, I got hired to rewrite it in 360
assembler; except for requirement to duplicate MPIO function, i got to
design and implement my own program; dispatcher, interrupt handlers,
device drivers, error recover, storage management, etc.

The datacenter shutdown at 8am sat. and didn't re-open until 8am mon
... so I had the machine room for 48hr period. I also got other
programming jobs ... and in the fall it was little difficult going to
monday morning class after not having slept for 48hrs.

The source assembler program eventaully grew to approx. 2000 cards
(could still fit in card box). The 360 assembler took a minimum 30
minutes to assemble the source and produce "TXT" deck (i.e. deck of hex
cards for execution loading). Since it took so long to assemble ... i
got pretty good at duplicating cards & punching patches. The "TXT" deck
just had hex "holes" ... no printing across the top and the 026 keypunch
was alphanumeric ... to get the correct combination of hex" holes, had
to used "multi-punch" feature ... use keyboard to force combination of
holes to be punched. Put the original card in the duplication slot and
then duplicate out to the columns for the patch ... multi-punch the new
hole combinations and then duplication the remaining columns.

Got fairly good at being able to interpret the hex holes in "TXT" deck
... having to fan the deck to find the card that had the correct
displacement in the program (for applying the patch). Was typically able
to do patches in much less time than it took to re-assemble.

past post containing format of TXT card (as well as table for hex punch
hole combinations):
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2007q.html#69 IBM System/3 & 3277-1

much, much later I was at SJR in san jose and my brother was regional
apple marketing rep (supposedly had largest physical region in CONUS).
He would come to town periodically and I could go to business dinners
with him. Got to argue with some of the mac developers about design
... before the mac was even announced.

--
virtualization experience starting Jan1968, online at home since Mar1970