OT whinge - timber

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Just got some timber delivered today, left in my carport, as per
instructions.

When I went out to check it, I find that one piece is badly damaged.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/sylviae/damagedTimber.jpg

The piece of wood it's sitting on is 20cm wide, so we're not talking
about a small defect.

Why would the deliverer think I was going to accept a piece of timber in
that state? Alternatively, how could the deliverer have failed to notice?

Also, it's over 1cm short. How hard can it be to get the length right?

They're going to replace it, of course, but I shouldn't have to chase up
things like this.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber

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Why is it the deliverer's responsibility?  They might be just delivering
what they are given.



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Re: OT whinge - timber
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I should have made it clear that he's an employee of the supplier, not a
third party.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber
On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 12:20:10 +1000, Sylvia Else

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Thats delivery/couriers for you, seems to be a common trait in my
experience.

The last time something like this happened to me, it was for a set of
new 16" steel wheels for a 4WD. I noticed one of the boxes was
destroyed, but wrapped back around the wheel. I check the wheel and it
was crushed to half it's original size. How in the hell they managed
to subject it to that amount of punishment is anyone's guess.

Anyway, that courier tried to get me to sign off on them with a
straight face, knowing full well the wheel was stuffed. Of course,
they were of no help at all in replacing it and the company I bought
the wheels from ended up footing the bill for that.

Re: OT whinge - timber
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Reminds me of way back, when someone sent me a large monitor to use in
some work I was doing for them. When it arrived, it was completely dead.
On examining it closely, I found that the casing was cracked. So, it
turned out, was the circuit board. The thing had obviously been dropped
a sigificant distance during transport, but the courier company said
nothing.

Sylvia.


Re: OT whinge - timber
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The only way to buy timber is to select it yourself. Otherwise you end
up with the rubbish left over that they can't sell off the rack.

Re: OT whinge - timber
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There's probably some truth to that, though it wouldn't surprise me if
this timber was damaged either during cutting or during delivery - the
damage looks fresh.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber
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looks like it was scraped by the tine of the forklift when it was unloaded
from the truck that brought it from the timber mill, or subsequently
when moving stock around.

--
⚂⚃ 100% natural

---

Re: OT whinge - timber
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I suppose that works, if we then assume that the tine split the wood at
the top and someone just pulled off the worst of the loose bits before
leaving the timber ready for sale. In that case, there was still someone
who was aware of the damage, but did nothing about it.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber

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Are you erecting this carport yourself? If not the installer would have
fixed the problem and then you would not have had to worry.

Metro.....



Re: OT whinge - timber
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It's not for the carport. It's a replacement joist for the deck. It
wouldn't need replacing if the tradesmen I employed to construct the
deck had put something up that would last for more than ten years. It
would have, too, if it had been properly sealed so that moisture
couldn't get trapped between the decking boards and the joists. I dare
say I got what I paid for, but there was no discussion at the time about
my paying extra for something that would last a lot longer.

It should not be necessary for a person to do detailed research into a
trade in order to get tradesmen to do a good job.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber

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Sylvia if that is the case I wouldn't be using just a bit of treated pine as
a joist. Decent bit of hard wood  ( excuse the pun ) would be the way go.
That's what I used.

Metro...

Metro



Re: OT whinge - timber
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The current treated pine joists were installed 10 years ago to replace
the previously existing hardwood joists, because the tops of the latter
had rotted to the point where it was no longer practical to attach the
decking to them. They had certainly lasted a lot longer, but it seems to
me that they had the same underlying problem which was that they had not
been protected from the accumulation of moisture between the decking and
the joists, which is how the rot starts.

Most of the joists are undamaged. There seems little point in my
replacing just a few with hardwood.

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber
On Wed, 06 Jul 2011 17:04:05 +1000, Sylvia Else

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I bought some wooden lattice work from Bunnings, such as the type used
to raise the height of boundary fence.   This was some sort of treated
pine.
http://www.burdetts.com.au/wwwroot/images/Lattice.jpg

The elements were just stapled together and could be separated easily
by tugging on them.   Therefore the first step was to lay them out and
nail in galvanized flat-head nails and then turn over the projecting
sharp bits.

This took a lot of work.

The wood looked kind of crappy and porous, so a paint job was deemed
necessary.   A large pot of green acrylic paint ($95) was applied in
two generous coats.

This took a lot of work too.

The contractor on site then mounted the trellis to the fence, but it
didn't look right.   The trellis needed a top rail to set it off and
keep the water out of the top of the slats.- so back to Bunnings and
then more painting.

This was a lot of stuffing about.   Still the whole thing looked
great.

12 Months passed, and the trellis assembly began to list inwards
because the nails inserted by the contractor gave way.

Bummer!

Back to Bunnings for about 24 large 6" coach bolts with large washers,
and an auger drill, and one whole Saturday, to drill though the mess
and insert the large coach bolts and tighten them.

This took a lot of work.

Now the trellis has been in many years and still looks great.   The
acrylic paint, the top rail, and the large coach bolts did the trick.
I hope the "contractor" rots in hell.




 



Re: OT whinge - timber
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coach bolts are a lot of work, 150mm bugle head batten screws or
roof screws are easier it install (if you've got a big-ish drill)
because they're self drilling and they're usually stronger too.

--
⚂⚃ 100% natural

---

Re: OT whinge - timber
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As part of my decking task, I removed some galvanised bolts that were
installed just three years ago. Already they show some corrosion. I'm
starting to think that stainless steel is the only way to go if one
wants something to last (but it's damned expensive).

Sylvia.

Re: OT whinge - timber
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Have a look at www.stainlessstore.com.au. Haven't tried them yet but
will soon.

Tony



Re: OT whinge - timber
On Wed, 06 Jul 2011 22:47:41 +1000, Sylvia Else

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Wood will last decades if it can dry out completely soon after getting
wet.   The design of your project may be faulty.   Generally:

1/ Use a suitable wood, treated if possible.
2/ Use concrete foundations, then a steel bracket, and bolt the timber
to this.
3/ Ensure wood has angled cutoffs so any water can drain off
immediately.
4/ Use paint to seal across wood grain. (Staining the wood is not the
same thing.)
5/ If possible roof over the decking with poly carbonate sheeting;
expensive sure, but it is the final solution.

Check out the Google images thing for decking keywords, and drill down
to find a solution to your problems.

Brass/bronze fittings may be cheaper than stainless.  Check yachting
suppliers.


Re: OT whinge - timber
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One of the joists, now removed. Prior to its removal, I had scraped out
the rotten wood with a screwdriver to determine the extent of the rot.
The staples are there because they were holding some plastic in place to
keep most of the rain out while I decided what to do.

The joist is 4.5cm wide by 19 cm deep. The rot had penetrated more than
halfway down, and as shown, through one of the sides.

 From what I understand about rot, this was probably all caused by a
single spore landing where it could take hold.

The rest of the joist is completely sound as far as I can determine.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/sylviae/woodrot.jpg

Re: OT whinge - timber

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The decking looks like it needs some attention also. You should never
counterbore screw holes on decking. Water just fills them up causing various
hassles over time.

Metro....



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