kids and vintage technology

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Kids and vintage technology

Kids from a school in Québec, Canada, are in front of 80s 90s generation
technologies have to find what are those
objects used for.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdSHeKfZG7c


Cheers Don...

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Don McKenzie

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Re: kids and vintage technology
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I've never seen that square yellow box with the plunger on top either. I
think it said it was an 8-track cartridge player. I've heard of 8-track
cartridges, but never seen a player like that.

--
Long-time resident of Adelaide, South Australia,
which probably influences my opinions.

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I have not seen one like this either only front loading ones, they
were also used in cars.

IIRC the tape was in an endless loop, and the button (probably the
plunger)
was used to change tracks.  The tape was fed out of the centre of
single the tape reel,
past the heads, pinch roller then back onto the outside of the roll.
The tape reel free wheeled, it wasn't driven from the centre like on a
normal cassette


There were 4 "sides" - 8 tracks (4 stereo pairs.)
I don't know if you could fast forward but you definitely cannot
rewind.

The button would step the tape heads down across the tape to access a
different stereo pair of tracks
when it reached the bottom it would jump back up and start over when
the button was pressed.  Due to the
size of this button, it probably was mechanically stepped.  Some more
expensive units were done using a solenoid driven
step mechanism. IIRC some of them had buttons marked 1,2,3,4 and
pressing them would take it automatically to the desired
track rather than having to press a single button multiple times.




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I've only seen 8-track players in cars. Can't recall any standalone ones.


--
Long-time resident of Adelaide, South Australia,
which probably influences my opinions.

Re: kids and vintage technology
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I had one way back when the daily was an hk327

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Re: kids and vintage technology
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Tandy (radio shack) used to have them in their catalogue even in the
late 1970's,
but I never owned one as even earlier on it was clear that the Compact
Cassette
that we still? use now was the way that the consumer were going.
Lack of rewind and Fast Forward ? probably didn't help.

Can't remember if standalone 8 track units recorded as well, don't see
why they wouldn't be able to.

Tandy's units may have gone under the brand "Realistic" but am not
sure now.



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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3D%qj9OEmUr0F8


You could also take a look at this if you want to feel old ;)

Re: kids and vintage technology
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technologies have to find what are those
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The black kid had the turntable figured out, doing a little scratching!



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Re: kids and vintage technology

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Enough stereotyping please!



Re: kids and vintage technology
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They should have figured that one out easily, there are plenty of
music videos in recent years that
show them using turntables and scratching :)

Re: kids and vintage technology
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Stand-alone decks were quite common. Back in the '70's I had a couple of
8-track decks which could record.

Akai had a high-end open-reel deck with an 8-track in the side for dubbing
your favorite tracks.

...... Zim


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