Is bluetooth a flawed technology?

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Seems like it never works that good. I've tried it with several completely
different devices and it's always playing up. In comparison my cordless
phone is much more reliable over much larger distances. Is there something
fundamentally wrong with bluetooth? Did they pick the wrong frequency or
something?

Cheers,
Michael



Re: Is bluetooth a flawed technology?


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Bluetooth is optimized for low-power, low-bandwidth applications in
embedded situations, at the expense of range. It is in no way comparable
to cordless phone technology.

Cheers,
Nicholas Sherlock

--
http://www.sherlocksoftware.org

Re: Is bluetooth a flawed technology?


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Bluetooth is designed for very short range (10m) and very low power
devices, you can't compare it to a cordless phone.
What devices are "playing up" and how?
Millions use bluetooth every day, seemingly without too much issue.

Dave :)


Re: Is bluetooth a flawed technology?


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BTW, many cordless phones use the same frequency spectrum as Bluetooth
(2.4GHz)

Dave :)


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My understanding of it was that class 1 bluetooth is good for 100m.
I use it with 12dB high gain antennas to get up to 3 KM range. I
understand the standard also allows up to 3W output power.



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Yes, Class 1 has a nominal range of 100m
I've used it in a large open factory and was lucky to get 30m.

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Not that I am aware of. Class 1 @ 100mW is the highest listed:
http://www.bluetooth.com/Bluetooth/Learn/Basics /

Dave :)


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There's no doubt class 1 is 100mW, but I'm sure in some pdf doc
I saw, a maximum output figure of 3W was quoted it's was brought
to my attention by an engineer working with Bluetooth. I just wish
I could find it to give a URL!.



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I have a bluetooth headset that is meant to be top of the line. It has
trouble connecting with my phone. I've had 2 phones and both were pretty
much the same although the new one is a bit more reliable.
I bought a bluetooth dongle for the PC and it had so much trouble connecting
with the phone I went back to usb.
A customer is using it for mouse and keyboard and wants me to fix it every
time I go over. I can get it working but it's always screwing up.

Michael



Re: Is bluetooth a flawed technology?



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What brand and model phone Michael?
There are some known documented incompatibilities.

Cheers,
Alan



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I had a nokia 6310i and now a nokia 6820. The headset is a motorola HS850.

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Re: Is bluetooth a flawed technology?



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There is a known problem with most Nokia mobiles and Bluetooth devices of
other brands.
Cure - get Nokia Bluetooth devices to work with your Nokia mobile phone.
Alternatively ditch the Nokia mobile for another brand of phone.
I have the HS850 headset and it works perfectly with my Motorola V3.

Cheers,
Alan



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If the heavies in the industry can't get it right doesn't that
indicate flawed technology? There are so many cases of bluetooth
devices working with one device like a mobile phone but refusing to
pair with, say, a laptop that I think that we can conclude that the
answer to the OP's subject line is "Yes".

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Quite possibly so.  All I can say is the Nokia to other brands problem is a
reasonably known and documented one.
However so far (touch wood), I've experienced little or no problems with my
Motorola V3 communicating properly to my Motorola HS850 and HF850 devices.

Cheers,
Alan



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There are 2 bluetooth platforms, Nokia and Seimans use one, the rest use the
other. It's the same with home computers, there is IBM and Mac. This isn't a
problem, it's manufacturers refusing to standardise.



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Knowing nokia, with their phones that implode the day after the warranty
runs out, I wouldn't be suprised if it was intentional.

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Is there a technical reason it's flawed? Did they use the wrong frequency or
something?



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The problem seems to be the protocol that allows a Bluetooth device to
have an encrypted link with another Bluetooth device but not to all
Bluetooth devices. You are supposed to be able to use your Bluetooth
headset with both your mobile phone and your laptop but your Bluetooth
mouse has not got much to say to your mobile phone. You definitely
don't want a stranger's head set to talk to your devices.

This page indicates the complexity
<http://www.bluetooth.com/Bluetooth/Apply/Troubleshooting/

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Maybe you have a strong source of local interference ?

geoff



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All non comercial frequencies are unreliable. Its the nature of the
business. They become worse when you get hacks near you trying to make
amplifiers and super high gain antennas.

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Seems like I was right, by pure coincidence I found this in an article in PC
Authority Oct 2006 page 18:

"A textbook example of how not to create a standard would have to be
bluetooth. The Bluetooth Special Interest Group was so fractured by
differing visions that contrasting features sets were given priority at the
expense of interoperability. The industry is only now starting to sort out
that mess."

Michael



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