infra red

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I have a universal remote.  When the batteries get low, one of my devices
still responds to the remote, but another device doesn't.

What would be the cause of this?  I assume there is the same amount of
electricity going to both devices since they both plug into the wall.  Could
it be that the infra red receiving unit in one of the devices is simply of
lower sensitivity than the other one?



Re: infra red

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Some things have crap IR remotes - my Sony VCR needs the remote to be
accurately aimed at point-blank range.

In the end I gave up and bought a DVB-T recorder.

Look on the bright side - in the days of ultrasonic remotes, a lorry going
down the street applying air-brakes used to turn everyone's telly off.



Re: infra red (an OT remark)
responding to http://www.electrondepot.com/australian/infra-red-52877-.htm

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...

Learning something new every day. Ultrasonic remotes? Never heard of this
type until today. Turn out that's how they flipped channels in the 70s :)
I wonder if some fine tuned whistles could also work on those? Like a 70s
version of TV-be-Gone?

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Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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I used to enjoy walking through the local David Jones TV department
jangling a bunch of keys, watching their display TVs switch to random
channels.


Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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the squeak of closing blinds used to switch them off.

Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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Then some can recall when the remote was connected with a cable !!


Re: infra red (an OT remark)

"Rheilly Phoull"

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** Nothing wrong with that  -  just follow the cable to find the lost remote
!!

The one fitted to mid 60s Krieslers had brightness, volume and channel
up/down -  it even had a small speaker for private listening ( like a drive
in ) and a mini jack for an earpiece.

The turret tuner in the set was driven around by an AC motor and stopped at
pre-set positions, each channel had its own fine tune control.  On the front
panel were 12 indicator lights to show which VHF channel was on.

Channel surfing during commercials was brilliant innovation.


...   Phil






Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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Yeah, that was the one I was thinking of. The ideas are all old, only
the methods are changing I reckon.

Rheilly

Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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I can remember seeing one of those around 1976 (when I was still
young:), and was really impressed by it. Don't remember the brightness
control but it had the inbuilt speaker, and the other goodies.  A
friend's elderly grandmother had it, as at her age she was confined to
a chair for most of the day, and this was great for her not to have to
get up to change channels, or turn the set down when the phone rang
etc.



We still had a B&W Astor "Royal" set that you had to get up and change
the channel, but with only 2 channels in our area at the time, it
wasnt as big a drama as it would be now, where you can flip around
about 15 or so, and still find nothing to watch.

As a teenager, I remember making up a "remote power switch" for the TV
in my room, it involved a cable and a 240v switch.




Re: infra red (an OT remark)
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Threw one of those out three weeks ago when moving (manufactured just
about when they stopped using valves)


Re: infra red
On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 17:00:24 -0000 "Ian Field"

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Were those the remotes that had tuning forks in them? I remember having
one of those, but I didn't think they were ultrasonic.

Re: infra red

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The early remotes used a frequency discriminator to produce a signal voltage
level which was decoded to the remote function.

Tuning forks probably preceeded an oscillator with a pushbutton selected
resistor chan in the RC circuit.

From that point it doesn't matter whether the tones are carried to the TV by
a cable or used to modulate the drive to an ultrasonic transducer.



Re: infra red

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That would be my guess.

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