How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View



Makes you want the NBN.

Residents at Point Cook near Melbourne have stopped queuing large
downloads and started bringing on-demand movies down the pipe in under
15 minutes after swapping "abysmal" ADSL1 connections for superfast
broadband.

Three of the 1,500 residents in the coverage area of Telstra's
fibre-to-the-home (FttH) trial network have spoken to iTnews about their
experiences.
--------------------------------

Cheers Don...



--
Don McKenzie

Site Map:            http://www.dontronics.com/sitemap
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it

you have a link mate ?

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it


Sorry, yes a link would help somewhat:
http://www.itnews.com.au/News/219996,revealed-how-100-mbps-broadband-will-rock-your-world.aspx

Cheers Don...



--
Don McKenzie

Site Map:            http://www.dontronics.com/sitemap
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



Don McKenzie wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
While I like the idea of fast comms, I do wonder whether its worth it to
deliver stuff like movies and other packaged consumer items.  How much
does all the infrastructure cost, compared to the cost of posting a DVD
through snail-mail ?

--
Regards,

Adrian Jansen           adrianjansen at internode dot on dot net
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



:
:Don McKenzie wrote:
:>
:> Makes you want the NBN.
:>
:> Residents at Point Cook near Melbourne have stopped queuing large
:> downloads and started bringing on-demand movies down the pipe in under
:> 15 minutes after swapping "abysmal" ADSL1 connections for superfast
:> broadband.
:>
:> Three of the 1,500 residents in the coverage area of Telstra's
:> fibre-to-the-home (FttH) trial network have spoken to iTnews about their
:> experiences.
:> --------------------------------
:>
:> Cheers Don...
:>
:>
:>
:While I like the idea of fast comms, I do wonder whether its worth it to
:deliver stuff like movies and other packaged consumer items.  How much
:does all the infrastructure cost, compared to the cost of posting a DVD
:through snail-mail ?


Yes, I agree. It doesn't make any sense to spend over $30B just so homeowners
can spend their leisure hours downloading and watching movies in almost real
time. It is not as if people are not time-poor now when they should be spending
more time interacting with their kids and family instead of stuck in front of a
computer or networked TV set watching stupid movies. If that is the main aim of
the NBN then it is a sad waste of resources which could be better targetted to
business, medical, education sectors who would benefit from such bandwidth and
speed. 99% of the population certainly don't need it.

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



Quoted text here. Click to load it


Yep, we can pretty much do all that now on ADSL2+. Seems like a waste to me
as well, I keep thinking I must be missing something.



Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



:
:> wrote:
:>
:> :
:> :Don McKenzie wrote:
:> :>
:> :> Makes you want the NBN.
:> :>
:> :> Residents at Point Cook near Melbourne have stopped queuing large
:> :> downloads and started bringing on-demand movies down the pipe in under
:> :> 15 minutes after swapping "abysmal" ADSL1 connections for superfast
:> :> broadband.
:> :>
:> :> Three of the 1,500 residents in the coverage area of Telstra's
:> :> fibre-to-the-home (FttH) trial network have spoken to iTnews about
:> their
:> :> experiences.
:> :> --------------------------------
:> :>
:> :> Cheers Don...
:> :>
:> :>
:> :>
:> :While I like the idea of fast comms, I do wonder whether its worth it to
:> :deliver stuff like movies and other packaged consumer items.  How much
:> :does all the infrastructure cost, compared to the cost of posting a DVD
:> :through snail-mail ?
:>
:>
:> Yes, I agree. It doesn't make any sense to spend over $30B just so
:> homeowners
:> can spend their leisure hours downloading and watching movies in almost
:> real
:> time. It is not as if people are not time-poor now when they should be
:> spending
:> more time interacting with their kids and family instead of stuck in front
:> of a
:> computer or networked TV set watching stupid movies. If that is the main
:> aim of
:> the NBN then it is a sad waste of resources which could be better
:> targetted to
:> business, medical, education sectors who would benefit from such bandwidth
:> and
:> speed. 99% of the population certainly don't need it.
:
:
:Yep, we can pretty much do all that now on ADSL2+. Seems like a waste to me
:as well, I keep thinking I must be missing something.
:


Oh, and it gets even better when you consider that homeowners may not be allowed
to opt out of having their current copper based communication facilities
upgraded to fibre when it is being rolled out in the neighborhood. I encourage
you to read the Telstra documentation regarding their Velocity (FTTH) offering
which will form the basis on which the NBN is to be rolled out
http://www.telstra.com.au/smartcommunity/homeowners.html

Imagine the situation where an elderly non-computer savvy person who is not
interested in having the NBN connected. They may only require a fixed line
service and no internet. So if the copper network and dedicated Telstra PSTN
exchanges are going to be made redundant with the advent of FTTH then they will
be up for added expense and ongoing maintenance for their UPS (read the battery
pdf). It will be the responsibility of the homeowner to monitor the condition of
the UPS back-up battery supplying the ONT during mains power outages. AFAIK,
small UPS of the type installed for the ONT don't have a battery test and
monitor facility so how does a non tech-savvy pensioner know when to change the
battery to ensure a reliable telephone service during power outages? They will
probably only find out at some distant time in the future when the mains power
is off for several hours and they try to use the phone and get nothing because
the battery is dead. They will be responsible for ensuring the battery in the
UPS is changed regularly by a licensed contactor at great expense. A Panasonic
12V, 7Ah battery will set them back around $40 plus the contractor fee (approx
$60 - $70 min) to change it over for them. This will be a far cry from the
present community service access provisions of the copper based PSTN network we
know today.

That's progress???

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world
Quoted text here. Click to load it
allowed
Quoted text here. Click to load it
of
Quoted text here. Click to load it
A most unlikely model ou are proposing  , the logical conclusion is dsl
/100mbs from neighbourhood fibre connection distributors which makes the
most economic sense considering they can be dropped into existing
exchanges for a fraction of the fibre to the house proposal , imagine a
western town with a few hundred houses and fibre to the nearest large
town 30k off.Running fibre to the local exchange is drawn via existing
infrastructure and a router is dropped into the frame for bugger all
relative cost , if the copper wont handle the distribution then a cheap
wireless link which is stable and piss easy to install.

--
X-No-Archive: Yes

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world

:>
:> :
:> :>  wrote:
:> :>
:> :>  :
:> :>  :Don McKenzie wrote:
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>  Makes you want the NBN.
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>  Residents at Point Cook near Melbourne have stopped queuing large
:> :>  :>  downloads and started bringing on-demand movies down the pipe in
under
:> :>  :>  15 minutes after swapping "abysmal" ADSL1 connections for superfast
:> :>  :>  broadband.
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>  Three of the 1,500 residents in the coverage area of Telstra's
:> :>  :>  fibre-to-the-home (FttH) trial network have spoken to iTnews about
:> :>  their
:> :>  :>  experiences.
:> :>  :>  --------------------------------
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>  Cheers Don...
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :While I like the idea of fast comms, I do wonder whether its worth it to
:> :>  :deliver stuff like movies and other packaged consumer items.  How much
:> :>  :does all the infrastructure cost, compared to the cost of posting a DVD
:> :>  :through snail-mail ?
:> :>
:> :>
:> :>  Yes, I agree. It doesn't make any sense to spend over $30B just so
:> :>  homeowners
:> :>  can spend their leisure hours downloading and watching movies in almost
:> :>  real
:> :>  time. It is not as if people are not time-poor now when they should be
:> :>  spending
:> :>  more time interacting with their kids and family instead of stuck in
front
:> :>  of a
:> :>  computer or networked TV set watching stupid movies. If that is the main
:> :>  aim of
:> :>  the NBN then it is a sad waste of resources which could be better
:> :>  targetted to
:> :>  business, medical, education sectors who would benefit from such
bandwidth
:> :>  and
:> :>  speed. 99% of the population certainly don't need it.
:> :
:> :
:> :Yep, we can pretty much do all that now on ADSL2+. Seems like a waste to me
:> :as well, I keep thinking I must be missing something.
:> :
:>
:>
:> Oh, and it gets even better when you consider that homeowners may not be
allowed
:> to opt out of having their current copper based communication facilities
:> upgraded to fibre when it is being rolled out in the neighborhood. I
encourage
:> you to read the Telstra documentation regarding their Velocity (FTTH)
offering
:> which will form the basis on which the NBN is to be rolled out
:> http://www.telstra.com.au/smartcommunity/homeowners.html
:>
:> Imagine the situation where an elderly non-computer savvy person who is not
:> interested in having the NBN connected. They may only require a fixed line
:> service and no internet. So if the copper network and dedicated Telstra PSTN
:> exchanges are going to be made redundant with the advent of FTTH then they
will
:> be up for added expense and ongoing maintenance for their UPS (read the
battery
:> pdf). It will be the responsibility of the homeowner to monitor the condition
of
:> the UPS back-up battery supplying the ONT during mains power outages. AFAIK,
:> small UPS of the type installed for the ONT don't have a battery test and
:> monitor facility so how does a non tech-savvy pensioner know when to change
the
:> battery to ensure a reliable telephone service during power outages? They
will
:> probably only find out at some distant time in the future when the mains
power
:> is off for several hours and they try to use the phone and get nothing
because
:> the battery is dead. They will be responsible for ensuring the battery in the
:> UPS is changed regularly by a licensed contactor at great expense. A
Panasonic
:> 12V, 7Ah battery will set them back around $40 plus the contractor fee
(approx
:> $60 - $70 min) to change it over for them. This will be a far cry from the
:> present community service access provisions of the copper based PSTN network
we
:> know today.
:>
:> That's progress???
:A most unlikely model ou are proposing  , the logical conclusion is dsl
:/100mbs from neighbourhood fibre connection distributors which makes the
:most economic sense considering they can be dropped into existing
:exchanges for a fraction of the fibre to the house proposal , imagine a
:western town with a few hundred houses and fibre to the nearest large
:town 30k off.Running fibre to the local exchange is drawn via existing
:infrastructure and a router is dropped into the frame for bugger all
:relative cost , if the copper wont handle the distribution then a cheap
:wireless link which is stable and piss easy to install.


I don't know where you live mate but that is not the scenario in Australia with
the proposed NBN. This will be FTTH only in capital cities and wireless for
rural areas off the beaten track. The reason we won't get a NBN based on fibre
with copper for the final 300 metres (so-called FTTN) is because Telstra owns
and maintains the existing copper infrastructure and all the other ISP's have to
rely upon Telstra for providing and maintaining their networks while at the same
time competing with them. With the advent of the NBN, Telstra - who owned and
maintained the copper - will have to sell their underground infrastructure to
NBNCo so they can use it to pull their fibre through. This means that Telstra
will give up their copper network completely and no longer support it. Unless
you have fibre to the home you won't get anything - unless you go for wireless.

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world
Quoted text here. Click to load it
superfast
Quoted text here. Click to load it
about
Quoted text here. Click to load it
it to
Quoted text here. Click to load it
much
Quoted text here. Click to load it
DVD
Quoted text here. Click to load it
almost
Quoted text here. Click to load it
main
Quoted text here. Click to load it
me
Quoted text here. Click to load it
PSTN
Quoted text here. Click to load it
condition
Quoted text here. Click to load it
AFAIK,
Quoted text here. Click to load it
the
Quoted text here. Click to load it
network
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  t's the most economic way to buikd it and technically superior in many
respects

  silly idea at best which is why it will fail


This will be FTTH only in capital cities and wireless for
Quoted text here. Click to load it
to
Quoted text here. Click to load it
same
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  yup which is flawed badly

  With the advent of the NBN, Telstra - who owned and
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  but the new owners are obliged to do so  hence your theory is heavily
flawed , remember contracts can be altered anytime
  Unless
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  bullshite


--
X-No-Archive: Yes

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world

:>
:> :On 20/07/2010 12:58 PM, Ross Herbert wrote:
:> :>
:> :>  :
:> :>  :>   wrote:
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>   :
:> :>  :>   :Don McKenzie wrote:
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>   Makes you want the NBN.
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>   Residents at Point Cook near Melbourne have stopped queuing
large
:> :>  :>   :>   downloads and started bringing on-demand movies down the pipe
in
:> under
:> :>  :>   :>   15 minutes after swapping "abysmal" ADSL1 connections for
superfast
:> :>  :>   :>   broadband.
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>   Three of the 1,500 residents in the coverage area of Telstra's
:> :>  :>   :>   fibre-to-the-home (FttH) trial network have spoken to iTnews
about
:> :>  :>   their
:> :>  :>   :>   experiences.
:> :>  :>   :>   --------------------------------
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>   Cheers Don...
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :>
:> :>  :>   :While I like the idea of fast comms, I do wonder whether its worth
it to
:> :>  :>   :deliver stuff like movies and other packaged consumer items.  How
much
:> :>  :>   :does all the infrastructure cost, compared to the cost of posting a
DVD
:> :>  :>   :through snail-mail ?
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>
:> :>  :>   Yes, I agree. It doesn't make any sense to spend over $30B just so
:> :>  :>   homeowners
:> :>  :>   can spend their leisure hours downloading and watching movies in
almost
:> :>  :>   real
:> :>  :>   time. It is not as if people are not time-poor now when they should
be
:> :>  :>   spending
:> :>  :>   more time interacting with their kids and family instead of stuck in
:> front
:> :>  :>   of a
:> :>  :>   computer or networked TV set watching stupid movies. If that is the
main
:> :>  :>   aim of
:> :>  :>   the NBN then it is a sad waste of resources which could be better
:> :>  :>   targetted to
:> :>  :>   business, medical, education sectors who would benefit from such
:> bandwidth
:> :>  :>   and
:> :>  :>   speed. 99% of the population certainly don't need it.
:> :>  :
:> :>  :
:> :>  :Yep, we can pretty much do all that now on ADSL2+. Seems like a waste to
me
:> :>  :as well, I keep thinking I must be missing something.
:> :>  :
:> :>
:> :>
:> :>  Oh, and it gets even better when you consider that homeowners may not be
:> allowed
:> :>  to opt out of having their current copper based communication facilities
:> :>  upgraded to fibre when it is being rolled out in the neighborhood. I
:> encourage
:> :>  you to read the Telstra documentation regarding their Velocity (FTTH)
:> offering
:> :>  which will form the basis on which the NBN is to be rolled out
:> :>  http://www.telstra.com.au/smartcommunity/homeowners.html
:> :>
:> :>  Imagine the situation where an elderly non-computer savvy person who is
not
:> :>  interested in having the NBN connected. They may only require a fixed
line
:> :>  service and no internet. So if the copper network and dedicated Telstra
PSTN
:> :>  exchanges are going to be made redundant with the advent of FTTH then
they
:> will
:> :>  be up for added expense and ongoing maintenance for their UPS (read the
:> battery
:> :>  pdf). It will be the responsibility of the homeowner to monitor the
condition
:> of
:> :>  the UPS back-up battery supplying the ONT during mains power outages.
AFAIK,
:> :>  small UPS of the type installed for the ONT don't have a battery test and
:> :>  monitor facility so how does a non tech-savvy pensioner know when to
change
:> the
:> :>  battery to ensure a reliable telephone service during power outages? They
:> will
:> :>  probably only find out at some distant time in the future when the mains
:> power
:> :>  is off for several hours and they try to use the phone and get nothing
:> because
:> :>  the battery is dead. They will be responsible for ensuring the battery in
the
:> :>  UPS is changed regularly by a licensed contactor at great expense. A
:> Panasonic
:> :>  12V, 7Ah battery will set them back around $40 plus the contractor fee
:> (approx
:> :>  $60 - $70 min) to change it over for them. This will be a far cry from
the
:> :>  present community service access provisions of the copper based PSTN
network
:> we
:> :>  know today.
:> :>
:> :>  That's progress???
:> :A most unlikely model ou are proposing  , the logical conclusion is dsl
:> :/100mbs from neighbourhood fibre connection distributors which makes the
:> :most economic sense considering they can be dropped into existing
:> :exchanges for a fraction of the fibre to the house proposal , imagine a
:> :western town with a few hundred houses and fibre to the nearest large
:> :town 30k off.Running fibre to the local exchange is drawn via existing
:> :infrastructure and a router is dropped into the frame for bugger all
:> :relative cost , if the copper wont handle the distribution then a cheap
:> :wireless link which is stable and piss easy to install.
:>
:>
:> I don't know where you live mate but that is not the scenario in Australia
with
:> the proposed NBN.


:  t's the most economic way to buikd it and technically superior in many
:respects
:

Economic to build and technically superior doesn't mean it is the most feasible
or most easy to use and maintain for the end user.

:  silly idea at best which is why it will fail

Isn't this staement contradictory to your argument?
:
:
:This will be FTTH only in capital cities and wireless for
:> rural areas off the beaten track. The reason we won't get a NBN based on
fibre
:> with copper for the final 300 metres (so-called FTTN) is because Telstra owns
:> and maintains the existing copper infrastructure and all the other ISP's have
to
:> rely upon Telstra for providing and maintaining their networks while at the
same
:> time competing with them.


:  yup which is flawed badly

Of course. The network cabling infrastructure should have been separated from
Telstra when it was privatised so that this impasse was eliminated. But that is
now history...

:
:  With the advent of the NBN, Telstra - who owned and
:> maintained the copper - will have to sell their underground infrastructure to
:> NBNCo so they can use it to pull their fibre through. This means that Telstra
:> will give up their copper network completely and no longer support it.


:  but the new owners are obliged to do so  hence your theory is heavily
:flawed , remember contracts can be altered anytime

You are completely wrong. You should read the policy statements from the
government's broadband website
http://www.dbcde.gov.au/broadband/national_broadband_network/policy_statements

quote
The NBN fibre network will be progressively rolled out in different areas and
there will be a transition period during which Telstra will still be expected to
operate and maintain its existing copper network within fibre coverage areas.

Telstra will have a regulated obligation to continue to operate and maintain its
existing copper lines while the fibre network is rolled out, until the copper
exchange associated with that fibre area is decommissioned.
unquote

Note that the existing Telstra exchanges will be decommissioned after the
completion of the fibre rollout, ie. the copper network disappears completely.

and;

quote
NBN Co will progressively provide the infrastructure that will enable delivery
of high speed broadband services to all Australians.
unquote

Note the ALL Australians...


:  Unless
:> you have fibre to the home you won't get anything - unless you go for
wireless.


:  bullshite

See the previous quote.

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Will all the movie downloads choke the speeds?

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not at the proposed cost.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

What's the big deal?
My Bigpond cable connection has for years been able to pull a movie down in
under a claimed 10 minutes:
http://www.bigpond.com/internet/plans/cable /

And in practice it is indeed insanely quick at downloading anything that is
sourced directly from the local proxy server at Bigpond and not actually via
the net.
If the content comes via the actual net then it's still as slow as the
thinnest pipe.
Real shame I get charged for uploads though...

Dave.

--
================================================
Check out my Electronics Engineering Video Blog & Podcast:
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 17:53:42 +1000, "David L. Jones"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

What exactly does this article mean.
It seems that 3 out of 1500 residents are downloading movies.
What are the other 1497 people doing?


Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



Quoted text here. Click to load it

A fair percentage of them are renting DVDs, and before long they'll be
downloading movies.



Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Probably reading a few emails and maybe some online banking, at a projected
cost of $42Billion!

MrT.





Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it

*snort*

And of course Stephen Conroy is going to #$%^ it up like everything else.
Victorians have a chance to boot him out at the next election:
http://filter-conroy.com /
PLEASE!
If he gets booted I promise to publically admit that Melbourne is better
than Sydney!

Dave.

--
================================================
Check out my Electronics Engineering Video Blog & Podcast:
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


@newsfe17.iad:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
else.
better

The software guys here have told me they are going to vote 'below the
line' and put Conroy last. So that should help a little! Everyone who
feels that way should take that effort.

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world


Quoted text here. Click to load it

More to the point, the Guvmint will have control of a huge slice of the
country's internet connection. This makes eavesdropping, censorship and
other policy decisions easy to implement. No need to talk to the ISP's
any more.

Re: How 100 Mbps broadband will rock your world



Quoted text here. Click to load it
else.

Just as long as they get rid of Senator Fielding first !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
HE is a FAR bigger proponent of censorship.

MrT.



Site Timeline