fuses

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Hi all,

How can one identify whether a blown fuse is a fast blow fuse or slow blow
fuse without any other information supplied?

thanks




Re: fuses



"eltan"
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**  In general,  you simply cannot.  If the fuse has no markings and the
fuse wire is vaporised all you have is a glass tube with end caps.

However,  a blown fuse is not much use to anybody so the point is moot. What
you may importantly need to know is what sort of fuse to replace it with.

For that, you need to consider the application, examine any markings on the
equipment that indicate fuse type and rating plus use a bit of electronics
common sense.

It is very risky to assume the fuse that you find in something ( whether
blown or not) is the correct type.

Others may well have been there before you and tampered or the factory may
even have installed the wrong type.

I see it all the time in service work  -   I now have a nice collection of
25, 30 and even 50 amp fuses recovered from gear that required no more than
a 2 amp fuse.

Now, if you would like to come back with details of the SPECIFIC question
you  ** REALLY  ** needed answering  -   maybe I can help.




......   Phil




Re: fuses


Also, when replacing a fuse, can the amperage be higher?

Thanks Phill.

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blow
What
the
than



Re: fuses





Phil wrote:-


 Others may well have been there before you and tampered or the factory may
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than


"eltan"  wrote----


Also, when replacing a fuse, can the amperage be higher?

Thanks Phill.



****Thick as!!!!!

Brian Goldsmith.




Re: fuses


the answer to your last question is not "no" but a "kind of a yes"



But then you may as well not have a fuse there to protect your electronics
or wiring why not just short out your fuse holder.


If it is a fuse for the house wiring why not just save time and anxiety,
just burn your house down to the ground



Also, when replacing a fuse, can the amperage be higher?

Thanks Phill.

















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blow
What
the
than




Re: fuses



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I took your advice and now I have nowhere to live! Gah! What sort of
advice do you call that Frank!??!?!?!

Re: fuses



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If the OP specified what the fuse was for, it might just make life a little
easier.

As for ridiculous sized fuses, I've come across it before, most common I've
seen is person X owns a 12v regulated PSU for radio/tv whatever, buys
multiples of fuses at a hit, rated at 20 or so amp 250v, takes them home and
sticks then in the 12v and 240v sides, not thinking it only takes a few amps
at 240 to get their 20amp 12v.



Re: fuses


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read the code stamped into the cap.


in my (limited) experience

slow blow have wire wound on glass fibres (or similar material)
fast blow have a spring inside.
normal have just wire.


--

Bye.
   Jasen

Re: fuses




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**  The Good Lord may well forgive this asinine Kiwi clot cos he knows not
of what he speak ....


    But never me.




......  Phil





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    In my experience, the fuses with "T" after the rating are slow-blow
ones. "T" means "timed", or so I read once.

Bob




Re: fuses


Thanks Bob, I'll look at that when I buy some slow blow & fast blow fuses.


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Re: fuses


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Bob,

I was once told by a German tech that the "T" came from the german word
"Trage", which translates to "slow" or "lazy". Now there's some useless
trivia for you.....

Andy


Re: fuses


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   I remember seeing that word in relation to delay fuses, maybe on a
packet of them, but never got around to translating it. Thanks for the info!

Bob




Re: fuses



"Bob Parker"
 Andy wrote:

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**  The actual German word is  " trage "  with 2 dots on top of the  "a"

  =   bovine, inert, dull, lazy, leaden etc.

See:

http://www.iee.et.tu-dresden.de/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/wernerr/search.sh?string=tr%E4ge&nocase=on&hits50 %



.......   Phil




Re: fuses


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http://www.iee.et.tu-dresden.de/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/wernerr/search.sh?string=tr%E4ge&nocase=on&hits50 %
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    The Google language translator says träge means 'slowly-acting'...
exactly correct in this context.

Bob


Re: fuses



"Bob Parker"


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**   Ok,   how did you get the  " a "  with two dots to appear?

      CNTRL  ???




......  Phil



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    Nothing that sneaky. I followed your link and simply copied and
pasted the word complete with the little dots from that web page!

Bob

Re: fuses



"Bob Parker"
 Phil Allison wrote:

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** The surprising thing is that  " trage " WITHOUT  the two dots has another
meaning.




.......   Phil





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  >
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    Well how about that! Who said this newsgroup's not educational? :-)

Bob



Re: fuses


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    Windoze XP has a little-known function you can get at from All
Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools -> Character Map which lets you
copy all those weird chäräctérs. :)

Bob



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