Free SCSI Drives, etc

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Hi Folks,

Free:  a bunch of old SCSI HDD Drives, Interface Cards, Tape Drives, CD
players and a CD recorder.

See  http://members.wideband.net.au/gzimmer/Misc/SCSI.JPG

Not shown are about 5 other HDD Drives (they are all 100 Mb).

If you can use them, write    gzimmer AT wideband DOT net DOT au
You get to pay postage from country Victoria.
else they go in the dumpster.

Cheers .................... Zim



Re: Free SCSI Drives, etc



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that segate h/drive shown is that a 100mb?
ive never seen them that low, ive only seen
them in 4-10gig.

zack



Re: Free SCSI Drives, etc



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that segate h/drive shown is that a 100mb?
ive never seen them that low, ive only seen
them in 4-10gig.

zack



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Jeez, that makes me feel old.
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--
Clint Sharp

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You must be one of those youngsters.

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I guess he must be.

I remember the first Hard drive I ever bought was only 20Mb.
I thought I would never fill it, 3 months later I bought a 40Mb

--
Laurie.
Registered Linux user # 468070

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My first was 5 megs, it was pretty obsolete when I got it (for free) in
1986. I then graduated first to an 80 meg SCSI then to a pair of 8" 350
meg SCSI drives (they were in an external case which kept your feet warm
on cold nights).

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Lucky you, my first 10MB drive cost me $500 plus $150 for the controller
card!

MrT.



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And I remember getting 2 cdrom readers at $1000 each for my office, and
all I had was two disks to read, the IFRB master frequency lists.

--
Laurie.
Registered Linux user # 468070

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That was a bit too steep for me. My first 2x Panasonic CD reader "only" cost
$350. :-)
Disks weren't cheap either, even the first crappy Microsoft Encarta was over
$100 from memory. They were giving them away a few years later.

MrT.



Re: Free SCSI Drives, etc


keithr Inscribed thus:

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Yikes !  That reminds me that I still have my old 5Mb Seagate ST5 from
1981 and the first SCSI HDD I bought, 68Mb if I remember...  I don't
recall any 8" platter drives of that size.  I do remember the 12 or 14"
dia disk packs.
Must be getting old...

--
Best Regards:
                     Baron.

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Remember my first drive, Seagate 20 Mb. I got RLL controller card and formatted
it to 30 Mb, then got second identical drive. 60 Mb lasted me for a long time in
DOS days...

Tom

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To give you and idea of how far it has gone:

I bought a 100mb in 1990-1 for my then new 16mhz 286 computer I built
from the guts of a failed XT machine.
Im pretty sure that it was an IDE unit of similar size to modern
drives and cost over $400
At the time and that was a good price.

You also needed an IDE (or whatever format used) card for the drive.

The card I had also included a floppy drive and clock/calendar chip
on the card. It MAY have had a serial/parallel/game port on it as
well, but Im not sure if that was a separate card again.
.
Basically, other than a keyboard interface and card slots -
motherboards had NOTHING to interface to the outside world. Everything
was an optional card.

Prior to that I had a 20mb unit in a used XT that I had. It didnt use
IDE - it had 2 separate cables, and was either MFM or RLL operated.
IT was a 5 1/4" case and cant remember if it was as high as 1 or 2
modern CD ROM drives.

Prior to that, in about 1987 on a tour of HP, I remember being shown a
shoebox sized hard drive that was about 70mb.  It made quite loud and
"rhythmic" "rap music beat" type sounds when it operated, it sounded
quite "cool" actually :)

PC's were usually only owned by professionals or well off computer
enthusiasts who had a specific use for them, and were expensive and
not user friendly for the non-technical user.

Most didnt use hard drives, dual floppies would be normal (1 for
program, 1 for it's data).

The first "Winchester" hard drive (presumably for use in a home or
office "desktop" rather than in a computer data centre) came in a 5mb
version and cost around the $4000 mark  IIRC



Thinking about it, the most advanced "computerised devices" that the
average everyday person got to actually use until the 1990s were
commercial arcade video games. (and to a lesser extent home versions)
These usually had reasonable colour graphics and many had synthesised
sound.



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The first drives that I worked with were Control Data 10 meg removable
packs circa 1973. They had 14" platters, and the heads were moved by an
electric motor through a rack and pinion gear. There was a detent wheel
to lock the heads in place when on track, and it was about a 2 hour job
to set one up, adjusting the seek speeds to get it stable. They were
replaced by 40 Mb removable pack drives also 14" with the heads moved by
a hydraulic system. Finally we got to voice coil driven units with a 100
Mb drive being the size if a washing machine. Then came the "Winchester"
style drives about 350 Mb with non removable platters sealed in an
enclosure with the heads.

About 1982, the Japanese came out with the first sealed unit drives that
I saw, 10.5" platters giving 440 Mb and later 625 Mb. IBM however stuck
with the old winchester technology and 14" platters for the 3380 drive
which had 2 sets of heads each giving 625 Mb later doubled and tripled.
They were bastards of things, the platters were set vertically and were
driven by a 1 horsepower motor through a flat rubber belt. They looked
like something out of the ark, and changing an HDA (Head/disk assmbly)
was not a job that you looked forward to. These were still in use on
mainframe sites up to 1995 at least.

These days, my employer makes storage units that can hold up to 2000
3.5" drives. The drives can be fibre channel, solid state or SATA
depending on the level of performance you require, and you can have any
combination of RAID 1, 10, 5, or 6 protection. There is also up to 256
GIGs of RAM (mirrored) in there as cache.

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Most (if not all) 286 motherboards had the CMOS clock chip on them
as this chip was also used to store configuration settings.

Having 2 serial 1 parallel 1 (or half) game port, 1 IDE bus and and 1
floppy bus on a single 16 bit ISA card was quite common.

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also has connections for the speaker.



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Clock card must have been on the XT then.  IT did date the files
correctly.


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yes, that could just "beep"
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That's what the original IBM PC was, just had keyboard and cassette
interface.

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The 2nd floppy drive was an essential upgrade for non hard drive users back
in the day. It meant you could have a DOS boot/utilities disk permanately in
A: and your program/data disk in drive B:

Single drive was pain because you either had to keep swapping disks every
time you exited a program (or did a disk copy), or you added command.com and
a few choice utils to every disk in your collection!

I think I paid around $400 for my first 20MB hard drive, those were the
days...

Dave.

--
---------------------------------------------
Check out my Electronics Engineering Video Blog & Podcast:
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I paid  a bit over $400 each for my first two Shugart SA-400 drives -
the first of the 5.25 inch floppy drives. They were single sided, only
35 tracks, and the first controllers could only do single-density,
giving a capacity of about 100KB.  $400 back then was probably
equivalent to a few thousand dollars in today's money.

Andy Wood
snipped-for-privacy@trap.ozemail.com.au

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My first drive was a stringy floppy at around $299USD in 1979:

http://www.digibarn.com/collections/devices/stringy-floppy/index.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exatron_Stringy_Floppy
http://www.classic-computers.org.nz/system-80/hardware_accessories.htm#stringy

well, that was after I got sick of loading and saving programs from a
Radio Shack audio cassette :-)

Cheers Don...




--
Don McKenzie

Site Map:            http://www.dontronics.com/sitemap
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Re: Free SCSI Drives, etc

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remember the old 8 inch floppy drives?

also had a 8 inch h/drive the motor ran on 240volts ac
belt drive to the platters was 40meg



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