Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?

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In a burst of enthusiasm when I was much younger, I bought a large reel
of solder which I barely used.

It must have been at least 20 or more years ago. It looks similar to
this:
http://img-europe.electrocomponents.com/largeimages/C557130-01.jpg

Now I need to do some soldering again.  Would that old 60/40 multicore
of mine have deteriorated?

I'm thinking the rosin in the multicores may have gone off in some way
because when I tin the tip and then leave it unused for 10 minutes, it
turns brown and uneven on the tip.  I'm using brand new tips.

Maybe this is normal and happens even with less old 60/40 solder?



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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It's normal:

Wipe the unused solder's grey oxide layer off with a tissue taking care
not to stretch the solder and break up the flux inside it and then see
how it solders.

Rosin flux always goes brown as the volatiles come off as smoke and then
the remainder goes brown and then black. That's why you have a damp
sponge handy to wipe off the gunk with.

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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Unlikely. I've got solder from over 40 years ago, and I can't say I've
noticed any oddities with it. Are your new tips hotter than they used to
be? Does your iron have a thermostat, and is it stuck? Have you tried a
different iron?
--
Ian

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
won't be any good...you need the new improved DIGITAL solder with things
removed so you don't hurt yourself .......



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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Ouch!
But the old analog solder sounds so much smoother!

hee hee hee

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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Solder flux was definitely different - I was convinced it smelled
different  in the 1960s

And I dug this up :-

"As I mentioned, pine rosin is often the main ingredient of the
flux.  In a pinch, I have used raw rosin scraped from a pine tree,
but the smell is pretty bad.  [Still, I prefer it to the perfume
several manufacturers added to solder in the 1960's that smelled
of cheap incense.  But hey, it WAS the 1960's.]"

Http://yarchive.net/metal/soldering_flux.html

Brian
--
Brian Howie

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?

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Sad to say it has definitely gone off. Safe disposal will be costly so
please pack it carefully and send it to me QTHR where I will dispose of
it at no cost to you (probably on ebay).

I have solder well over 20 years old that is still fine to use...

--
Visit the Amazing Online Fleamarket at http://www.fleamarket.org.uk

Always lots of amateur radio gear!


Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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I was also going to suggest that, but I realised that it would be being
a bit cheeky!
--


Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
For rosin read resin.
Or as multicore called it - "Ersin"



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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As a youth I used Bakers Soldering Flux and Aluminium foil to make
Hydrogen for our lighter than air balloons. Bakers Soldering Flux was
32% Hydrochloric Acid.

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?

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Caustic Soda and Aluminium works much better for producing hydrogen, but you
have to watch the temperature as the mixture gets mighty hot and tends to
produce steam too.

In the days of coal gas, I used to inflate balloons using our gas tap under
the sink. I once let one go with a card attached and I got a reply from over
100 miles away!

The gas we get now jest aint light enough!

 



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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We made our hydrogen in coke bottles, and sometimes the reaction got so
hot the bottle shattered. One day we thought it would be a great idea to
put a fuse on the balloon and light it so that when the balloon got up
in the sky a bit it explode. The fuse was made from paper that had been
saturated in a potassium nitrate solution, (tell the chemist you mum
needs it to make sausages). The paper was dried and it becomes our fuse
paper.
However, as one of us held the balloon and the other lit the fuse the
flame from the match went on the balloon and it blew up in our faces
leaving us with the smell of singed eyebrows.
We eventually got it to work.

P.S Don't try this at home kids.

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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"When I were a lad"....

4 aluminium milkbottle tops (the tops, not the bottles!), Tizer bottle,
conc hydrochloric acid, balloon stretched over neck of bottle. When
balloon full, remove from bottle, and tie neck.

Prior to release, cotton string plus Jetex fuze wrapped around neck of
balloon. Light string, and blow out flame, leaving it to smoulder.

Release. Balloon rises into the blue. Smouldering string reaches Jetex
fuze. Fuze ignites and fizzes. Balloon explodes with either a loud bang
(if the hydrogen contains a fair proportion of air), or a whoop (if it
is pure).

You'd probably get 20 years for doing that today!
--
Ian

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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You'd be lucky to get prison time, more likely to get shot in the head
by an armed copper.
--
Clint Sharp

Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?



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I have an ancient reel of solder. I can't say I've noticed it 'go off'. It
may vary with the flux formulation.

Graham


Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
A few years back I bought a pound roll of fine Ersin multicore. I do so
little soldering nowadays that this roll is likely to outlast me, even if I
live another 20 years.

The flux isn't exposed to air, so the only way it can deteriorate is the
normal thermal degradation that any organic substance undergoes. I suspect
this occurs very slowly.

Again, we turn to the Lady from Philadelphia for advice: "Why don't you just
try soldering few test joints and seeing how well the solder works?" Duh.

PS: I'm bothered that electronic products increasingly have RoHS labels on
the box, and statements that they use non-lead solder. I really /don't/
believe that a lot of lead is leaching from waste sites into the water
supply, so we aren't likely to see much, if any, reduction in the amount of
lead (and lead compounds) in our water supply (is there any hard science on
this?), while the reliability of electronic products is likely to decline.

I like to say that there is no such thing as a hazardous substance. The
hazard occurs from how the substance is used (or misused).



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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I believe - in Europe at least - it's more to do with H&S in the work
place rather than the environment.

--
*Money isn‘t everything, but it sure keeps the kids in touch

    Dave Plowman         snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
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Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?

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I know of no cases of lead poisoning from the use of lead-based solder. I
touch solder directly when I work with it, and am not worried about lead
getting into my system.

I have no argument with people worrying about the huge amounts of electronic
equipment being dumped into landfills. The issue is whether potentially
hazardous substances in that equipment actually get into the air or water.



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?



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Certainly in the UK, landfills should be surrounded by impermeable clay. The
likelihood of lead getting through that is miniscule ( as is the amount of lead
tipped ).

Graham



Re: Does multicore solder deteriorate with age?
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Oh indeed. But the cynic in me says H&S legislation is more to prevent any
chance of an employer being sued than the actual health of the workforce -
especially if any incurred charges can be past on to others.  

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Well lead is one of the easiest extracted metals so certain parts of the
world are already 'contaminated' with it. It's a bit different when it's
modified so large concentrations can be airborne.

--
*It IS as bad as you think, and they ARE out to get you.

    Dave Plowman         snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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