Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close - Page 3

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Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close

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well maybe they do with the older stuff, but not with Plasma / LCD
panels. at least that is what two Samsung techs have told me


--
rgds,

Pete
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Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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No, they do that with LCD's.

It's exactly what they did when they fixed my TV last year, under warranty.

My friend said that is what they would do, and the part-swapper who came out
to fit the "new" board confirmed it was reworked. He pointed out the
capacitors that were replaced.




Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close


"Clocky"  wrote in message

felix_unger wrote:
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No, they do that with LCD's.

It's exactly what they did when they fixed my TV last year, under warranty.

My friend said that is what they would do, and the part-swapper who came out
to fit the "new" board confirmed it was reworked. He pointed out the
capacitors that were replaced.



Before the serviceman would start I had to sign a form agreeing to accept
"second hand " parts or whatever Samsung sent out in the words of the repair
guy.
He also said that the old board had to be sent back to Samsung. Sounds like
they may well repair boards and reissue. This was under warranty btw.


Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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With the right equipment replacing caps and SMT components, even IC's, takes
a few minutes so it would be economically viable to do so especially with
common faults. (like the dodgey caps in the power supply board causing the
click of death which affected nearly every Samsung LCD a couple of years
ago)



Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close

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Another 'click of death', albeit different. I well remember the Iomega
Zip drive 'click of death'... those drives were a complete PITA but
was better than using a floppy, I suppose. When they worked, that is.

Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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Err, they "were" a floppy albeit with a much greater capacity than the
useless 1.44 MB jiggers! I have a number of them around here and have
experienced few issues with them in recent years. I have 4 x 250 MB IDE
internal drives, 2 or 3 250 MB USB externals and 2 750 MB externals, one
USB, the other Firewire. The Firewire 750 lives on one of my Macs. Lost
count of the number of disk I have. No shortage however. The cheapness
of CDs and the proliferation of USB devices has rendered them all
somewhat redundant but they still find uses around here.

--

Krypsis

Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close

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We quibbble on terms then... :)

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Yep, I've pretty much gone to hard drives and USB memory sticks for
most things now.

Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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I think that was the Jaz - Zips were much more reliable.

geoff



Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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It definitely was the Zip that was afflicted with the click of death.
Had one myself many years back. It was, if I recall correctly, a 100 Meg
USB external drive, one of the later slimline case models. The 250 Meg
and larger zip drives didn't seem to be as badly afflicted.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Click_of_death

The Zip used floppy disk technology (a PET film disk) whereas the Jaz
used a rigid platter. Because the Zip used a "floppy" medium, it was
more rugged than the Jaz system. We had both forms of drives at my
workplace years back. I always carried a Zip drive and a few Zip
floppies to and from work in my briefcase. I was very reluctant to do
the same with the Jaz drive or media.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iomega_Jaz_drive

There is no reason why the Jaz drive could not develop a "click of
death" fault however. The term was originally coined to refer to the
action of the heads on a hard disk seeking to track zero repeatedly when
reference information on the platters was unable to be read. This
resulted in a clicking noise. Since the Jaz is effectively a removable
platter hard disk, it should be prone to exhibiting the same click in
similar circumstances. I never had the experience with a Jaz though had
it often on hard drives in the 90s.

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Krypsis

Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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I have several Zips and 4 Jaz drives.  The Zips still work (though not much
use for them nowadays), and all but 2 of my dozen+ Jaz cartridges died long
ago, most with the famous Click Of Death.

In the day it seemed the Jaz most vulnerable.

geoff



Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close

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Yes, but before there was Jazz there was Zip!, possibly around the
Mesolithic era :), and the Zip's had the COD before Jazz even saw the
light of day. I can remember writing about it in the days before Jazz .
btw.. I still have Zips and use them! However, Win7 does not support the
Iomega tools software, so you can't password protect them, unless there
is some other way of doing it.

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rgds,

Pete
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Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close

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No, Zips were infamous for the COD


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rgds,

Pete
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Re: Dick Smith: 189 of 386 stores set to close
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not possible with the design of many circuit boards today with the
components printed on the boards and the chips too small to de-solder,
and not to mention the time troubleshooting. cheaper/easier just to
replace the board

--
rgds,

Pete
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