Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna

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I'd have trouble doing this guys job:
http://www.koreus.com/video/reparer-antenne-540m.html #

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna
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Why
  over 40 or 50 metres anything further is academic as to the result

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Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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hmmm, static induced lightning from airflow, the fact it swings
around ten metres at the top in a strong wind, the fact you'd be
more or less rooted after the last 100 feet climb to the top.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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I've spoken to a few riggers who admitted that they've been thrown off
the tower they were working on.

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Coming down in base jump is pretty awsome though , and the $ is excellent
  Last fall did my confidence though and now more than 20 metres I find
it difficult

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Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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I understand a 2 metre fall in a harness is about the physical limit
a body can cop with. Speaking of base jumping, it would save climbing
back down the antenna again.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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When you have a good amount of tools hanging and maybe some fittings and
a coil of cable 2 metres really hurts

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Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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It would, but I suspect that climbing down is safer than jumping. A
parachute would be nice to have as a backup, but from that height, you
depend on nothing going wrong with the opening.

Sylvia.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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It's not academic. There are practical reasons as to why broadcast
towers are located on hills and buildings.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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comprehension isn't high is it ?
  tell me the diff between falling 300 M and 50 M ?
  the odds of survival are very small

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Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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From memory, anything over about 40-50 M, or so you reach terminal
velocity, so anything more is not going to make much difference to the
outcome.

For many people, even a fall from a few metres, depending on how you
land and what you land on could cause permanent injury or death.



One incident I can recall in the 1990's was when a guy (member of the
public) climbed about 1/2 way up an ABC AM radio tower some years back
in some form of protest that made it onto the regional news. Whatever
it was he wanted (wasnt a huge ask, I think it was some legitimate
dispute over a council rates notice or similar that had been ignored)
he did get, and eventually came down without incident after a day or
so up there.

The news reported that he was given aluminium foil by the negotiators
- claiming he would need to wrap it around his balls unless he wanted
to  be sterile from the radiation.  It was unknown whether or not they
turned the transmitter off while he was up there.

These towers were a triangular truss like structure, and a fall down
the centre of one of these would likely have you being thrown back and
forth many times between the structural members as you hit them, so
you would probably be pretty beat up before the time you reached
bottom.




Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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I remember a visit to the Bald Hills shortwave transmitter site in
1987 with about a 100 metre tall antenna with the full length driven
by 20KW or so: they said the induced voltage difference between your
hands and feet on the tower would electrocute you.

    For a demo the tech shorted out the last egg insulator on one
of the guy wires which had insulators every 10m or so with a length of
wire and struck up an arc like a small welder, the radio program came
through clearly.

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I have seen that one (not at bald hills), where they held an earthed
rod close to the guy wire, and you could hear the program in the
"arc".  They claimed that after it was first powered up, neighbours
complained of "speaking roofs" which turned out to be arcing between
the corrugated iron sheets, which resulted in announcers voices being
heard through the "arc".
Bonding them all together was done to solve this problem.

Out of interest, there was a similar ABC AM 5KW array at Hervey bay
QLD with 2 towers that was demolished about 3 years back and a new AM
system built a few KM away. I happened to see it on the 7 news at the
time, they just cut the guy wires and just let the tower simply drop,
then the guys moved in for the next couple of weeks, cut the thing to
bits and carted it off for scrap.


They also had a hut at Bald Hills with the old water cooled valves,
including radiators, pumps and water demineralisation system,
no longer used, but apparently not able to be demolished because of
the national trust or similar.  You see that antenna coming into
Brisbane from the north, its very impressive.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna



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I have seen that one (not at bald hills), where they held an earthed
rod close to the guy wire, and you could hear the program in the
"arc".  They claimed that after it was first powered up, neighbours
complained of "speaking roofs" which turned out to be arcing between
the corrugated iron sheets, which resulted in announcers voices being
heard through the "arc".
Bonding them all together was done to solve this problem.

Out of interest, there was a similar ABC AM 5KW array at Hervey bay
QLD with 2 towers that was demolished about 3 years back and a new AM
system built a few KM away. I happened to see it on the 7 news at the
time, they just cut the guy wires and just let the tower simply drop,
then the guys moved in for the next couple of weeks, cut the thing to
bits and carted it off for scrap.


They also had a hut at Bald Hills with the old water cooled valves,
including radiators, pumps and water demineralisation system,
no longer used, but apparently not able to be demolished because of
the national trust or similar.  You see that antenna coming into
Brisbane from the north, its very impressive.

I remember fondly a visit to the 6WF/WN transmitter at Wanneroo, near Perth.
There was a combiner hut right next to the mast, where the transmission
lines from the two transmitters (50KW and 10KW IIRC) merged into the feed to
the tower. The whole setup crackled with corona, in time with the program
material.

Don't suppose anyone knows where here are some pics of this setup and the
old transmitters themselves, which have long since been replaced with solid
state? Very little on the web that I can find.





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It was very old equipment probably 1920-1930's vintage, coils made out
copper waterpipe etc.



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There is a limited edition self published book by some radio engineer
that was very comprehensive and a good read for the average tech head.

I picked up some valves from the Darwin shortwave transmitter that the
Gov't sold to private enterprise on Ebay after it closed due to the site
lease expiring. As far as I know, even the scrappies weren't interested,
broadcast gear for the taking!!.


Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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I'll rephrase that: parts of the transmitter equipment (valves) were
sold on Ebay after closing.

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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!Hmm. I wonder what happened to the gear at Shepparton (Radio Aust). I
last worked there in 1964 . I remember the PA tubes (F124A) used a
combination of air and water cooling.
I also remember having to replace the cable (wire rope) linkage from the
front panel controls to the to the pa stage for tuning the PA stage.
I discovered the frayed cable (the first since install in the 40's, so I
ended up with the job of fixing it.
--
.Laurie.
Registered Linux user # 468070

Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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There's no market for radio towers, they were usually self erecting:
with the right gear you could use the tower to lower the section above
to the ground until the lowest last section was left and lower it with a
cable as it hinges off the base.

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AM broadcast towers are located in low lying swampy areas.


Re: Climbing a 540 metre transmitter antenna


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At that height a parachute would be worthwhile. Shame about the weight.

Sylvia.

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