bipolar power supply?

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View


n00b questions: 1) what exactly is a bipolar power supply? 2) why are
they used? 3) can i use a PC power supply to power an amp that needs a
bipolar power supply?


Re: bipolar power supply?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

A bipolar power supply is any supply made by Phil A.

Actually they probably mean one with + and - rails
w.r.t. ground.

Re: bipolar power supply?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Phil isn't bipolar he's just very negative.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

No, I must speak up for Phil (and Rod Speed)!  I was warned when subscribing
to this group to killfile both to preserve my sanity. Googling their 'work'
confirmed this. But nearly all of their recent posts have been helpful and
unabusive.  So judge as you find, I say...



Re: bipolar power supply?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I certainly have no problems with Phils helpfulness, and as an adult I
can tolerate the abuse, but if I had a young kid interested in
electronics I certainly wouldn't allow them on this newsgroup. Abuse is
one issue but the language used is another.

Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Agreed. Any on many. And some otherwise good posters seem incapable of
expressing anything with the f*



Re: bipolar power supply?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's basically a power supply that has equal positive and negative
rails with respect to a common ground. i.e. +/12V
So a bipolar supply will have a positive terminal, a negative terminal,
and a Ground (or Common) terminal.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They are used most for analog devices like amplifiers that need to
accept and generate positive and negative signals.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Most likely.
A PC power supply has both +/-5V and +/-12V outputs, so if it has the
current and other specs you need then it will work. It's common (no pun
intended) to turn a PC power supply into a bench power supply for all
sorts of purposes.
Sometimes they need to be modified though, to ensure that the don't
shut down under minimum loads etc. Should be plenty of info out there
on doing this.

Dave :)


Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

I would have to say that this depends on what type of amp the OP is
intending to use. If one was trying to drive a 1kW audio amp, then a
PC PSU is no good. If one was trying to drive an instumentation amp,
the the PC PSU is no good. If one was trying to drive a small practice
audio amp that requires +-12v then yes, a pc power amp would be fine.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: bipolar power supply?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

+ & - like everyone else says

2) why are they used?

where the output is needed to go both sides of ground

3) can i use a PC power supply to power an amp that needs a
Quoted text here. Click to load it

maybe, PC PSUs don't have much strength in their -12 and -5v outputs
if you don't need more than 1A at -5V and 0.5A at -12V it could work.

Bye.
   Jasen

Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

**As other have stated, it is + 0 - operation.

 2) why are
Quoted text here. Click to load it

**Lots of reasons. In audio equipment, it allows for the elimination of
output coupling devices (capacitors and transformers).

 3) can i use a PC power supply to power an amp that needs a
Quoted text here. Click to load it

**Sure, provided you don't want a great deal of power. The largest supply
rails available from a (standard) PC power supply are +12 Volts and -12
Volts. That translates to around 20 Watts @ 8 Ohms. However, there is a far
more serious 'gotcha'. The -12 Volt supply is usually a very low current
one. Absolutely useless for any sane amount of audio power. Typically your
power output will be limited to around 5 Watts, using the +/- 12 Volt supply
rails.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



--

Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm running a 5523-based headphone amp of PC +/- 12V.  Main problem is that
there is so much PSU-bourne noise - needs good filtering.

geoff



Re: bipolar power supply?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

This is a common thing that comes up alot with students. They need a
bi-polar supply for an amp and haven't the faintest idea where to get one.
Is this for a small project? What is your power rating? Assuming your doing
some op-amp stuff usually the easiest way is to simply use two batteries in
series. At one end is +ve at the other -ve and inbetween is 0v.

You can even start to get tricky, like have some chips powered from 0v to
'-5v' and other 5v to 0v to do something like semi inversion etc.



Site Timeline