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Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?

:
:
:PCB-mount banana sockets instantly bring the word 'fracture' to my mind...
:
:geoff
:


Taking a new look at the PCB 4mm socket in the link I gave to to Rapid seems to
infer that it must be mounted in a 4.8mm diameter plated thru-hole. Soldering on
both sides (and inside the thru-hole) would ensure maximum rigidity and freedom
from cracking.

Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?

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Solder is NEVER suitable as a mechanical joint.

Peter

Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
On Wed, 03 Dec 2008 00:45:25 GMT, the renowned Pete

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to
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on
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freedom
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Do you always glue down SMT parts before soldering?


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
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Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?

:
:> Taking a new look at the PCB 4mm socket in the link I gave to to Rapid seems
to
:> infer that it must be mounted in a 4.8mm diameter plated thru-hole. Soldering
on
:> both sides (and inside the thru-hole) would ensure maximum rigidity and
freedom
:> from cracking.
:
:Solder is NEVER suitable as a mechanical joint.
:
:Peter


What utter crap!

How do you think almost every electronic component is fixed to a PCB? If solder
wasn't a suitable mechanical joint then all those electronics enginers have been
seriously misguided over the past 80 years.

I don't think things have changed since I was tought the importance of soldering
in electronics back in the 1950's.

The purpose of soldering is to provide;
1)  mechanical support - to physically hold components together.
2)  electrical support - to ensure reliable electrical connections.

If you are referring ONLY to components which must endure some regular physical
stress (such as plugging in a 4mm banana plug) then for sure, extra strength is
required. I wouldn't call this particular action to be particularly stressful on
the soldered joint BTW. Also, if these TruConnect 4mm sockets from Rapid are
correctly mounted in a plated thru-hole of the correct diameter with adequate
sized solder pads, and they are soldered both top and bottom with a good fillet
of 60/40 solder, I would be prepared to guarantee that the joints will not
fracture over the lifetime of the product they are mounted in.

Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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One's that do so for components with external mechanical stresses on them
and no other mechanical means of support - yes, misguided.

geoff



Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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If the joint isnt going to get too hot (expand/contract with
temperature causing metal fatigue and cracking of the joint, or
overheat to the point that the solder starts to melt and form a dry
joint), or suffers lots of vibration that puts mechanical stress on
the join, and is done properly, on clean surfaces with enough solder
and the right soldering temperature it won't give any problems.

In consumer electronics pretty much all components, connectors, wires
etc are all held in their PCB's by solder alone. SMD devices are
usually glued down before soldering, but this is more to keep them in
place when they go through wave soldering, (board is turned upside
down during this process) the glue is not necessary to keep them there
once soldered in. (note - wires that go to plugs and headers are
typically crimped or use IDC to hold in place).

What is done in applications like military and space equipment, I dont
know.

I think you are thinking back to the old days with valve equipment
where there was a belief that joints (component leads and connecting
wires were attached to tag strips) should make adequate electrical
connection without needing solder (by being wrapped around the
terminal, or later, wire wrap,) and the solder should only be applied
to cover, protect and seal the join, not to make the electrical
connection.

If you have ever tried to unsolder and remove a component from one of
these chassis, you will know what I'm talking about :)



Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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Tell that to Fluke who have used PCB mount banana sockets from day one
in their famous 70 series meters.
Many other manufacturers too.

Dave.

Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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Yes.  I've fixed so many of those....


geoff



Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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Funny about the millions that have been working just fine for more
than 25 years, and it having the best rep in the industry for physical
reliability. Pardon the pub, but that ain't no fluke.
I've seen a lot more plastic banana jacks break than those Fluke PCB
barrel ones.

Dave.

Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?
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There is a degree of mechanical support there too *as long as the original
Fluke leads are used * - the lead's plug 'rubberised' ('plasticised' ?) hilt
moulding steadying the plugs in the holes, and transferring downward force
to the casing rather than the PCB.

geoff



Re: Bare PCB mount Banana Jack?



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http://www.rapidonline.com/Cables-Connectors/Connectors-Single-Pole/4mm-Connectors/4mm-Economical-PCB-socket/63896/kw/4mm%20pcb%20socket

Cheap enough ?

Graham


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