Australia: wireless broadband for east coast 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.

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Vividwireless adopts Huawei TD-LTE for east coast capitals
Company aims to offer download speeds of 40-70Mbps within 18 months, but has no
plans for resellers

Perth-based ISP, Vividwireless, has completed trials of Huawei’s TD-LTE wireless
broadband system and aims to offer east
coast customers 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.

Time Division Duplex Long Term Evolution (TD-LTE), is a mobile broadband
standard that is a newer version of LTE, which
is compatible with Wi-Max.

The telco showed off its high-speed wireless broadband trial at an event in
Sydney, demonstrating peak download speeds
of 127Mbps and an average of 94Mbps.
[ IT's a mobile world so dial-up the latest on tablets, mobile phones and telcos
with ARN's mobility newsletter ]

According to Vividwireless CEO, Martin Mercer, customers can eventually expect
download speeds of 40-70Mbps, upload
speeds of 4-7Mbps and latency of under 20ms.

http://www.arnnet.com.au/article/375699/vividwireless_adopts_huawei_td-lte_east_coast_capitals /

Cheers Don...

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--
Don McKenzie

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Re: Australia: wireless broadband for east coast 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.
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If you take a look at IINET plans for Tas NBN, they are a joke, still
have small download limits and about the same cost as an ADSL plan.



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Yes, I must be missing something with the NBN juggernaut.

here is my current service speed results:
============================
http://speedtest.syd.optusnet.com.au /
Last Result:
Download Speed: 19062 kbps (2382.8 KB/sec transfer rate)
Upload Speed: 489 kbps (61.1 KB/sec transfer rate)
Latency: 12 ms
Tuesday, February 08, 2011 5:23:43 AM
============================

I can get super speed broadband pack added, for an extra $20 a month.

"The Optus Premium Speed Pack upgrades your broadband connection to Optus'
fastest DOCSIS 3.0-based internet service
which increases download speeds by up to 4 times faster than regular cable
broadband when downloading most Australian
hosted content and popular overseas content."

OK, I can NOW, YES NOW get possibly 4 times the speed for an extra $20 a month,
but I don't want it or need it, and I am
running a business.

I have my own doubts about cloud computing and security, and I don't wish to
head in that direction. Leave all my data
and apps with someone else? Expect that someone else will have a 100% up time?
To me it is just another chain in the
link that I don't need. I know many will disagree with me of course. I do like
the cloud idea in principle.

So do we pay 40-ish gazillion bucks for an entertainment system, that my grand
children will have to pay for? I have my
doubts that it will deliver what it promises.

I know there are many angles to this argument, and the rural areas certainly
need something a lot better than they have
now. This is just my own personal view on the NBN juggernaut.

Cheers Don...

================


--
Don McKenzie

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Re: Australia: wireless broadband for east coast 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.

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So what are you paying now for a 19 Mbps service ? What else do you get ?





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'yes' Fusion $99 bundle, covers all Australian phone calls and Australian GSM
calls, plus 20gig a month data.

However I see they now have it advertised for 500gig a month, but I never use
close to 20, so I haven't chased it up.
There may be other items in the fine print that may alter the deal for me. I
think they make it only optus GSM calls free.

So for me, why fix if it ain't broken?

Cheers Don...

===========================


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Don McKenzie

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Re: Australia: wireless broadband for east coast 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.

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calls, plus 20gig a month data.
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close to 20, so I haven't chased it up. There may be
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make it only optus GSM calls free.
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Over here (Germany) the 'up to 32Mbit/s' cable costs 20 Euro/month for the first
year, then 30 Euro,
including Germany phone calls but no GSM.
The 'up to 100 Mbit/s' cable strangely enough also costs 20 Euro/month for the
first year, then 40 Euro.
The 6 Mbit/s cable service costs 18 Euro/month then 25 Euro.
So they are definitely trying to get you to sign up for 100 Mbit/s.

What I don't understand is how the cable will cope if a lot of people switch
over, since it is already
carrying stacks of analog and digital TV and radio stations. We have cable TV
(no terrestrial or satellite) and
several times a year something goes wrong and you lose all channels for a while
- I assume the cable Internet would
also go down when this happens ?
At least with DSL/VDSL you get your own copper back to the local exchange.





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We are able to only get ADSL 1 competitively, but there are no plans
that are worth considering if you go over 512k.

With ADSL 2 - you have to go through Telstra only, which means high
costs, small download limits etc.  The resellers offerings are not
much better. This also means no naked ADSL etc.

What this means is that the technology is already available and
installed, its being monopolised by Australia's worst internet
provider.

Legislation along the lines of allowing competition and access could
fix this problem, and give adequate speeds at little cost to the
public.

I doubt that there are a large number of areas left that have no net
access, or very slow speeds (for technical - not monopoly reasons),
and the cost of fixing them up would surely be miniscule compared to
the forced NBN for everyone ?


Another question, we have seen what happened in Egypt with the entire
net being shut off by their totalitarian government.

How do we know that the NBN is not designed to allow this to happen
more easily than it might be now - or how it might be more "censorship
ready" than the exisiting system.  Everything could be routed through
a central point, making it easy to inspect every "message" and
ccensor.,


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Bet it does. Pity about the price tho.

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That last is a lie.

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Many find that ADSL1 speeds are adequate and dont bother to pay for the highest
ADSL1 speed available.

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There are none when you include satellite.

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Yep.


Doesnt happen in the first world.

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Pity that that is illegal.



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Pity you're an idiot. In case you hadn't noticed, laws can be changed.


BTW, since when were the NSW Police granted the power to tap phones
without a warrant?

"Bikie gangs and organised crime groups are believed to have foiled
police attempts to tap their phones by importing untraceable, encrypted
BlackBerrys from Mexico.

The telecommunications black hole exploited by the Comanchero gang and
drug cartels has come to light after countries around the world -
worried about terrorism and national security - threatened to ban
BlackBerrys unless they were given the codes to break the encryption on
emails and messages".
http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/mobiles/bikies-blackberrys-beat-law-20110205-1ahmo.html

And since when was drug dealing a "terrorism" or "national security" issue?

Re: Australia: wireless broadband for east coast 40-70Mbps speeds within 18 months.
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easily than it might be now - or how it
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could be routed through a central point,
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Wota stunning line in rational argument you have there, child.

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Even someone as stupid as you should have noticed that
Labor is fresh out of magic wands to wave on that with the
current parliament, even after the Senate detail changes.

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warrant?

Quite some time ago now with drug crime in particular, fool.

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attempts to tap their phones by importing
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Just because some fool journo claims something, doesnt make it gospel, cretin.

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cartels has come to light after countries
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to ban BlackBerrys unless they were
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http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/mobiles/bikies-blackberrys-beat-law-20110205-1ahmo.html

Just because some fool journo claims something, doesnt make it gospel, cretin.

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Who said it was ?



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This is true for most country areas and quite a few metro areas, although in
a lot of areas there are ADSL2 alternates: Optus (90% pop coverage), iinet,
AAPT and various other small providers.

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Actually there are quite a lot of areas where ADSL isn't available, even in
metro areas. What we find is that there are hotspots in metro areas where
line lengths/quality/availability is such that ADSL services are simply not
available to customers.

The basic problem stems from the age of the copper network and decisions
made in the '80s and '90s when there was a explosion in line installations
to more effectively get lines to houses.  At the time innovative solutions
were implemented to get bulk lines into areas cost effectively and quickly,
which unfortunately do not work well with 3rd party equipment deployment
(RIMs, sub-exchanges & pair-gain systems)

The existence of this equipment means that there are large areas where the
only provider who has access to the customer line is tel$tra & therefore
there is little flexibility on cost & services.

Unfortunately to access the Telstra wholesale network is expensive & frankly
quite difficult to manage and it doesn't seem like telstra are trying to
make it any easier.

The other main issue is the copper itself.  All providers are held to ransom
by the aging copper network that nobody has any incentive to repair or
upgrade (Imagine Telstra's shareholders enjoying Telstra spending money con
the copper network that other providers have access to).

Bad quality copper from the exchange, in customer premises and copper runs
that are simply too long also create for ADSL services. I live in Willetton,
WA which is only 10 minutes drive from the CBD (on a good night :) and my
lines are 5KM long, which means I get at best about 4.2 Mbits.  Most people
living in country areas, in smaller towns without an exchange or farms will
be well outside the distance range of ADSL.

Wireless technologies attempt to fill these gaps, however those hotspots of
ADSL death tend to have a lot of 3G subscribers and the performance is
abysmal due to over-subscription.   Cell providers could install more cells,
however they have a financial incentive to run them over-subscribed so don't
tend to.

Satellite is okay for basic internet access, however the latency is agony
and a serious user will change to *anything* else once it becomes available.

Wireless will continue to provide a good medium for light weight
applications, such as smart phones an light browsing, however simple maths
tells us that we will always keep saturating busy areas and it's unlikely
we'll be able to transport high bandwidth applications such as TV over it at
any scale.

The advantages of the NBN is that we get an upgrade & infrastructure that
isn't under control of the major AU Telco monopoly, it can carry a *lot*
more bandwidth and therefore support more applications, which in turn means
that total telco costs will go down (or profits will go up).

I can see the NBN causing more ISPs to go out of business due to the large
connection costs and the industry in AU shrinking to a handful of players,
which won't help competition too much.

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Definitely, although the copper network does have some inherent limitations,
besides fibre is sooo much cooler :)

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Heh.
The yanks will get a nasty surprise the first time they throw that switch.

Bruce



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And all the problems you get with any shared bandwith system.

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Thats just with the pathetically small number of places that bother with the NBN.

Doesnt say anything useful about what will be the case with real
reseller competition and when the wholesale cost of the NBN in known.



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